Prevalence and Predictors of Oral Contraceptive Pills Use Among Yemeni Women in Dhamar Area
American Journal of Health Research
Volume 4, Issue 1, January 2016, Pages: 1-5
Received: Dec. 26, 2015; Accepted: Jan. 8, 2016; Published: Jan. 21, 2016
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Authors
Amat Al-Khaleq O. Mehrass, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thamar University, Dhamar, Yemen
Abdulelah H. Al-Adhroey, Department of Medical Basic Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thamar University, Dhamar, Yemen
Abdullatif D. Ali, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Thamar University, Dhamar, Yemen
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Abstract
In the face of continuous efforts of the government and international organizations, population growth rate in Yemen still high. The present study was aimed to investigate the current prevalence and predictors of oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) use among Yemeni women in Dhamar area. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 400 women using a semi-structured questionnaire. The results showed that the prevalence rate of OCPs use is 33%. General characteristics showed that almost half of the study population had no formal education, ˃ 3 living children, and ˂ 20 years at marriage. The predictors found to be significantly associated with OCPs use were age, educational level, age at marriage, number of living children, attitude on safety of OCPs, and practice on contraceptives-seeking behavior. The present study reported a rise in OCPs use and seeking behavior, but that was not consistent with the obstetric characteristics of the study population. Community mobilization with efficient health education would improve the awareness of Yemenis about the advantages of contraception in family well-being.
Keywords
Oral Contraceptive Pills, Prevalence, Predictors, Family Planning, Population Growth, Yemen
To cite this article
Amat Al-Khaleq O. Mehrass, Abdulelah H. Al-Adhroey, Abdullatif D. Ali, Prevalence and Predictors of Oral Contraceptive Pills Use Among Yemeni Women in Dhamar Area, American Journal of Health Research. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2016, pp. 1-5. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhr.20160401.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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