"Optimal Outcomes" in Autism Spectrum Disorder, Characteristics of Children Who Lost the Diagnosis of Autism
American Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Volume 5, Issue 6-1, November 2017, Pages: 42-42
Received: Oct. 10, 2017; Accepted: Oct. 12, 2017; Published: Oct. 13, 2017
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Authors
Kodra Valmira, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Service, University Hospital Center “Mother Teresa” Tirana, Albania
Zenelaj Besmira, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Service, University Hospital Center “Mother Teresa” Tirana, Albania
Mitro Ela, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Service, University Hospital Center “Mother Teresa” Tirana, Albania
Sanxhaku Dorina, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Service, University Hospital Center “Mother Teresa” Tirana, Albania
Allkoja Brikena, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Service, University Hospital Center “Mother Teresa” Tirana, Albania
Alikaj Valbona, Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Service, University Hospital Center “Mother Teresa” Tirana, Albania
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Abstract
Objective: To review the latest researches according the Optimal Outcomes in children with ASD and Characteristics of Children Who Lost the Diagnosis of Autism.
Method: Review of two studies: Deborah Fein at Al 2013 “Optimal outcome in individuals with a history of autism” which presents strengthened evidence that some individuals diagnosed with autism as young children do in fact lose their symptoms as they age. This study is the largest to-date and experts believe that it will change the way clinicians, scientists and parents think about autism. Characteristics of Children Who Lost the Diagnosis of Autism: A Sample from Istanbul, Turkey, a descriptive study reporting the characteristics of children who lost their diagnosis of autism and explaining the educational programs that these children followed.
Results: OO and TD groups’ mean scores did not differ on socialization, communication, face recognition, or most language subscales, although three OO individuals showed below-average scores on face recognition. Early in their development, the OO group displayed milder symptoms than the HFA group in the social domain, but had equally severe difficulties with communication and repetitive behaviors. Early intervention, high IQ and the development of communicative and language skills at an early age could be the most powerful factors contributing to an optimal outcome. These results provide strong evidence in support of the possibility of ‘recovering’ from ASD and demonstrate that it is, in fact, possible to reach a level of typical functioning, while not eliminating the possibility of residual deficits in the more subtle aspects of cognition and social interaction.
Conclusion: Although possible deficits in more subtle aspects of social interaction or cognition are not ruled out, the results substantiate the possibility of optimal outcome from autism spectrum disorders.
Keywords
ASD, High IQ, Optimal Outcome, Lost the Diagnose, Review
To cite this article
Kodra Valmira, Zenelaj Besmira, Mitro Ela, Sanxhaku Dorina, Allkoja Brikena, Alikaj Valbona, "Optimal Outcomes" in Autism Spectrum Disorder, Characteristics of Children Who Lost the Diagnosis of Autism, American Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience. Special Issue: “In and out of Your Mind” Abstracts of 1st Eastern European Conference of Mental Health. Vol. 5, No. 6-1, 2017, pp. 42-42. doi: 10.11648/j.ajpn.s.2017050601.52
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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