Rehabilitation after Hip Fracture Surgery in Dementia and Cognitively Intact Patients
American Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience
Volume 5, Issue 6-1, November 2017, Pages: 29-29
Received: Oct. 10, 2017; Accepted: Oct. 12, 2017; Published: Oct. 13, 2017
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Authors
Alexandru Bogdan Ciubară, Department of Morphological and Functional Sciences, Dunarea de Jos University, Galati, Romania
Paul Dan Sîrbu, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, UMF Iasi, Romania
Razvan Tudor, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, County Emergency Hospital, Vaslui, Roamania
Viorel Oltenacu, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, “Sf. Ap. Andrei” Hospital, Galaţi, România
Roxana-Cristina Damaschin, Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, “Sf. Ap. Andrei” Hospital, Galaţi, România
Anamaria Ciubară, Department of Psychiatry, Dunarea de Jos University, Galati, Romania
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Abstract
Introduction. The combined presentation of dementia and hip fracture in the elderly is emerging as a significant health issue worldwide. An individual with dementia is up to 3 times more likely than a cognitively intact older adult to sustain a hip fracture.
Objectives. 10 participants were recruited, 7 were women and 3 were cognitively impaired. Mean age was 80 years. All hip fractures are treated with surgery. This study analyzes recovery, incidence of delirium and 30-day mortality, after hip surgery.
Results and discussion. Patients with dementia make poor functional recoveries after hip fracture as compared to nondemented patients. Individuals with dementia use rehabilitation less after hip fracture surgery. Early operative intervention is important to patients because it results in less pain, which in turn leads to lower incidence of delirium. Patients with dementia experience higher rates of all-round morbidity and mortality following hip fracture.
Conclusion. The goal of acute-care hospital treatment of patients with hip fractures including those with dementia is to achieve the following outcomes: short time to surgery, few or no complications, control of pain, and early mobilization for restoration of function and gait. Following a hip fracture, patients with dementia are at higher risk of mortality and functional decline than those who are cognitively intact.
Keywords
Hip Fractures, Dementia, Postfracture Hip Rehabilitation
To cite this article
Alexandru Bogdan Ciubară, Paul Dan Sîrbu, Razvan Tudor, Viorel Oltenacu, Roxana-Cristina Damaschin, Anamaria Ciubară, Rehabilitation after Hip Fracture Surgery in Dementia and Cognitively Intact Patients, American Journal of Psychiatry and Neuroscience. Special Issue: “In and out of Your Mind” Abstracts of 1st Eastern European Conference of Mental Health. Vol. 5, No. 6-1, 2017, pp. 29-29. doi: 10.11648/j.ajpn.s.2017050601.39
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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