First Study of the Turkey (Meleagris Gallopavo) in Cameroon: Assessing Turkey Biodiversity in the Highlands of West-Cameroon
International Journal of Food Science and Biotechnology
Volume 2, Issue 1, February 2017, Pages: 16-23
Received: Oct. 29, 2016; Accepted: Feb. 25, 2017; Published: Mar. 17, 2017
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Authors
Tegadjoue Sindze Aubin, Laboratory of Biotechnologies and Bioinformatics, Department of Animal Productions, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences (FASA), University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon
Meutchieye Felix, Laboratory of Biotechnologies and Bioinformatics, Department of Animal Productions, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences (FASA), University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon
Djiotsa Dongmo Francis, Laboratory of Biotechnologies and Bioinformatics, Department of Animal Productions, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences (FASA), University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon
Kamta Tchoffo Romeo Omer, Laboratory of Biotechnologies and Bioinformatics, Department of Animal Productions, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences (FASA), University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon
Fogang Tagasine Aristide, Laboratory of Biotechnologies and Bioinformatics, Department of Animal Productions, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences (FASA), University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon
Manjeli Yacouba, Laboratory of Biotechnologies and Bioinformatics, Department of Animal Productions, Faculty of Agronomy and Agricultural Sciences (FASA), University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon
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Abstract
The study was undertaken from November 2015 to January 2016. It had as a general objective to contribute to the knowledge of turkey’s biodiversity of the Highlands of West-Cameroon for their safeguard and for their genetic improvement. More specifically, it was aimed at evaluating turkeys’ morphobiometric diversity and estimating correlation coefficients between measurements and Live Weight. To achieve these goals, a sample of 236 adult turkeys whose 141 females and 95 males was randomly selected in four Divisions in the zone of study. The principal results show that the turkey’s plumage colouring in the Highlands of West-Cameroon is very varied, with a prevalence of bronzed (54.50%). Head colouring is also very variable, but the blue-red (28.94%) and pink (23.86%) are more frequent. Shanks are most often pink (36.85%), but can also be black-red (21.30%) or clear-pink (20.30%). Eyes are black-chestnut (63.13%), chestnut (16.95%) and grey-black (12.18%). In the same way, studied quantitative characters are very variable, with a sexual dimorphism in favour of the males. Thus, the average weight of the studied animals is of 6.11 ± 0.19 Kg with a variation coefficient of 49%. However, males are approximately 23% heavier (7.93 ± 0.19 Kg) than females (4.89 ± 0.25 Kg). In addition, studied body measurements are significantly (P < 0.05) higher in tom turkeys, although variable with the considered Divisions. All the correlations are positive, but correlations between Live Weight and the length of the snood (r = 0.55) and the thoracic circumference (r = 0.53) are the highest ones.
Keywords
Turkey, Biodiversity, Morphobiometry, Correlations, West-Cameroon
To cite this article
Tegadjoue Sindze Aubin, Meutchieye Felix, Djiotsa Dongmo Francis, Kamta Tchoffo Romeo Omer, Fogang Tagasine Aristide, Manjeli Yacouba, First Study of the Turkey (Meleagris Gallopavo) in Cameroon: Assessing Turkey Biodiversity in the Highlands of West-Cameroon, International Journal of Food Science and Biotechnology. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2017, pp. 16-23. doi: 10.11648/j.ijfsb.20170201.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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