Effect of Some Traditional Processing Methods on Nutritional Composition and Alkaloid Content of Lupin Bean
International Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry
Volume 2, Issue 4, December 2017, Pages: 174-179
Received: Jul. 26, 2017; Accepted: Aug. 7, 2017; Published: Aug. 30, 2017
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Authors
Yadesa Abeshu, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Holeta Agricultural Research Center, Holeta, Ethiopia
Biadge Kefale, Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Holeta Agricultural Research Center, Holeta, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Sweet and bitter lupin bean were processed by traditional common processing methods soaking, cooking, fermenting and germinating techniques. The proximate, mineral and alkaloid content of unprocessed, soaked, fermented, germinated and cooked sweet as well as bitter lupin were determined. According to the results crude protein and carbohydrate were significantly highest in soaked and cooked than in fermented and germinated lupin bean. Fiber content, fat content and total ash were significantly reduced in cooked, soaked and fermented bean, but fiber and total ash significantly increased for the germinated sweet and bitter lupin. In the sweet lupin K, Zn, Fe levels were significantly reduced in soaked, fermented and cooked bean, but Na level was significantly highest in germinated, soaked and cooked except in fermented lupin bean. For the bitter lupin K level was significantly increased in soaked, cooked, fermented and germinated bean. But Ca and Na level significantly increased in cooked bean only. Fe and Zn significantly reduced in, cooked, soaked, fermented and germinated. Alkaloid content of the bean was significantly reduced in soaked, cooked, fermented and germinated, but it was highly influenced by cooking and soaking methods. The results indicated that cooking and soaking enhanced the nutrient contents and drastically reduced the lupin bean alkaloid content.
Keywords
Nutrients, Processing, Alkaloid, Lupin Bean
To cite this article
Yadesa Abeshu, Biadge Kefale, Effect of Some Traditional Processing Methods on Nutritional Composition and Alkaloid Content of Lupin Bean, International Journal of Bioorganic Chemistry. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2017, pp. 174-179. doi: 10.11648/j.ijbc.20170204.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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