Flow Assurance Analyses for Optimum Pipeline Transportation of Gas for Use in CNG Vehicles in Nigeria
Petroleum Science and Engineering
Volume 3, Issue 1, June 2019, Pages: 17-28
Received: Mar. 21, 2019; Accepted: Apr. 23, 2019; Published: May 23, 2019
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Authors
Igbojionu Anthony, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Anyadiegwu Charley, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Anyanwu Emmanuel, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Obah Boniface, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Ukwujiagu Chinedu, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
Muonagor Chukwuemeka, Department of Petroleum Engineering, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
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Abstract
The objective of this work is to conduct flow assurance analyses for optimum transportation of gas through pipelines for use in CNG vehicles in Nigeria. Port Harcourt – Owerri – Onitsha expressway is used as case. The work is for a pipeline network that would be laid from a gas treatment plant about 10km off the Port Harcourt - Owerri – Onitsha expressway to the five CNG refueling stations installed along the route for refilling the CNG vehicles. Flow assurance analyses include analyses on: condensate drop-out prevention; hydrate formation prevention; erosion prevention; slug formation tendency; and leak detection. They are performed to ensure that solids or liquids do not deposit in the pipeline. Condensate drop-out prevention analysis is conducted to determine the conditions within which hydrocarbon liquids would not form in the pipeline during the transportation of the gas. Hydrate formation is checked to establish the temperatures and pressures at which hydrate would not deposit in the pipeline. Erosion prevention analysis is performed to determine the velocity profile above which erosion cannot occur in the pipe. Slug formation tendency is evaluated to ensure that slugs do not form in the pipe. Pipeline leak is also checked by generating pressure profile that would govern the flow of gas in the pipe and help determine any possible leak of gas from the pipeline. The results of the analyses indicate that: liquid drop-out will not occur in the pipe if the temperature of the gas does not go below 65.73°F; once the temperature and pressure of the gas remain outside the hydrate curve, hydrate will not form in the pipe; the velocity profile along the pipe length is far higher than the erosional velocity therefore the possibility of erosion occurring in the pipe is highly minimal; slugs cannot form in the pipe since the fluid remains in single phase throughout the transportation in the pipe; with the pressure profile generated; leak detection is made easy by installing five pressure gauges at different lengths of the pipe and recording the expected pressures at these lengths. It is further observed from the work that these flow assurance parameters and tests are highly indispensable in gas transportation as the results of the analyses help the engineer to apply all precautionary measures to ensure that solids or liquids do not deposit in the pipeline. Recommendations are also made for the optimum operating conditions based on the flow assurance analyses.
Keywords
CNG, Transportation, Pipeline, Hydrate, Erosion, Leak, Condensate, Slug, Phase Envelop
To cite this article
Igbojionu Anthony, Anyadiegwu Charley, Anyanwu Emmanuel, Obah Boniface, Ukwujiagu Chinedu, Muonagor Chukwuemeka, Flow Assurance Analyses for Optimum Pipeline Transportation of Gas for Use in CNG Vehicles in Nigeria, Petroleum Science and Engineering. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2019, pp. 17-28. doi: 10.11648/j.pse.20190301.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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