Concentration of Heavy Metals in Some Animal Meats from Merowe–City–Sudan
Colloid and Surface Science
Volume 4, Issue 1, June 2019, Pages: 13-16
Received: Mar. 26, 2019; Accepted: Apr. 29, 2019; Published: May 27, 2019
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Authors
Mawia Hassan Elsaim, Department of Chemistry, College of Science and Technology University of Merowe Technology, Merowe, Sudan; Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing, China
Aisha Abdelrhaman, Department of Chemistry, College of Science and Technology University of Merowe Technology, Merowe, Sudan
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Abstract
This study was to determine the concentrations of essential metals such as namely Copper, Cobalt, Manganese, Iron and Zinc) and heavy metals such as Cadmium and Lead performed by atomic absorption spectrophotometer (AAS) in two sample of some animal meats of Mutton (sheep) and Beef (cow), collected from the district popularly in Merowe-city, north Sudan. The essential metals estimation in the investigated samples indicated the following range of concentration (0.19 -0.28mg/kg) for Cobalt, (0.36-0.31mg/kg) for Copper, (3.16-5.44mg/kg) for Iron, (0.12-0.15mg/kg) for Manganese, and (5.30 -7.6mg/kg) for Zinc respectively. These concentrations of essential metals are in the range of human necessities. The concentration of toxic metals (Cadmium and lead) in two samples is not mean detected. The results also showed that were significant differences of some essential elements concentrations (Mg/kg) in two samples. Generally meat of Beef was found to have to highest significant levels of metals and the meat of Mutton lowest levels. The concentration of Iron and Zinc concentration in all samples were within the tolerance limits.
Keywords
Heavy Metals, Meats, Animals, AAS, Sudan
To cite this article
Mawia Hassan Elsaim, Aisha Abdelrhaman, Concentration of Heavy Metals in Some Animal Meats from Merowe–City–Sudan, Colloid and Surface Science. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2019, pp. 13-16. doi: 10.11648/j.css.20190401.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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