Penetrating Superior Sagittal Sinus Post Part Injuries by Carpenter’s Nail
International Journal of Neurosurgery
Volume 3, Issue 1, June 2019, Pages: 1-4
Received: Mar. 18, 2019; Accepted: Apr. 23, 2019; Published: Jun. 5, 2019
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Authors
Zabsonré Denléwendé Sylvain, Neurosurgery Department, Yalgado Ouedraogo Teaching Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Kinda Boureima, Anesthésia and Reanimaton Department, Yalgado Ouedraogo Teaching Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Diallo Ismael, Infectiology Department, Yalgado Ouedraogo Teaching Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Sondo Kongnimissom Apoline, Infectiology Department, Yalgado Ouedraogo Teaching Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Savadogo Mamadou, Infectiology Department, Yalgado Ouedraogo Teaching Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Korsaga Alexandre, Trauma and Orthopedic Department, Yalgado Ouedraogo Teaching Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Tinto Sayouba, Trauma and Orthopedic Department, Yalgado Ouedraogo Teaching Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Haro Yacouba, Neurosurgery Department, Yalgado Ouedraogo Teaching Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
Kabré Abel, Neurosurgery Department, Yalgado Ouedraogo Teaching Hospital, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso
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Abstract
Introduction. Superior sagittal sinus posterior part injuries can rapidly lead to death by uncontrollable bleeding. The type of weapon used, the size of the sinus wound and the portion of the sinus concerned can make their gravities. We report diagnostic circumstances, treatment and evolution of 3 cases of penetrating superior sagittal sinus injuries by carpenter's nail. Methods. We describe 3 cases of a penetrating superior sagittal sinus posterior part injuries by carpenter's nail admitted in Neurosurgery department of Yalgado Ouédraogo University Teaching Hospital of Ouagadougou in 2007, 2013 and 2017. Results. Three patients aged 25, 28 and 24 years respectively admitted 19 hours on average after a traumatic brain injury by a penetrating object. Circumstance was the popular verdict 1 case. In the other cases, the circumstance could not be elucidated. The neurological examination was normal for the 3 patients. Local examination noted in 2 patients, a nail implanted in the skull in the posterior part of the median line. In 1 patient, there were 2 punctiforms wounds of the scalp in the posterior part of the median line. CT scan showed a large nail about 10 cm long in 2 patients and 2 nails of the same size in 1 patient. These nails were in contact or crossing the superior sagittal sinus in its posterior part. The removal of these nails was done under general anesthesia. The postoperative course was simple under antibiotic prophylaxis. Conclusion. Posterior sagittal sinus injuries by carpenter's nails were criminal origin in a context of popular justice. During their ablation under general anesthesia, bleeding from the superior sagittal sinus caused by nails removal was controlled by finger compression and stopped by placement of hemostatic compresses. Apposition of epicranium reinforced the dura closure.
Keywords
Head Injuries, Carpenter’s Nail, Superior Sagittal Sinus
To cite this article
Zabsonré Denléwendé Sylvain, Kinda Boureima, Diallo Ismael, Sondo Kongnimissom Apoline, Savadogo Mamadou, Korsaga Alexandre, Tinto Sayouba, Haro Yacouba, Kabré Abel, Penetrating Superior Sagittal Sinus Post Part Injuries by Carpenter’s Nail, International Journal of Neurosurgery. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2019, pp. 1-4. doi: 10.11648/j.ijn.20190301.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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