Medicinal Plants:-Traditional Knowledge and Practices in Some Communities of Ethiopia
International Journal of Ecotoxicology and Ecobiology
Volume 2, Issue 2, June 2017, Pages: 56-60
Received: Aug. 22, 2016; Accepted: May 17, 2017; Published: Jun. 30, 2017
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Authors
Zeleke Wolde Tenssay, Access and Benefit Sharing Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Edigetu Merawi, Access and Benefit Sharing Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Tesfaye Bekele, Access and Benefit Sharing Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Binyam Goshu, Access and Benefit Sharing Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Yibrahu Emishaw, Access and Benefit Sharing Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Ashenafi Ayehune, Access and Benefit Sharing Directorate, Ethiopian Biodiversity Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
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Abstract
In Ethiopia, traditional knowledge associated with medicinal plants are being seriously depleted due to deforestation, environmental degradation and acculturation that have been taking place. The present study documented traditional knowledge associated with medicinal plants in Decha (Keffa) and Sheybench (BenchMaji) districts of Southern Nations, Nationalities and. The objective of the study was to identify and record traditional knowledge and practices associated with the medicinal plants with special emphasis on plants with potential for bio-prospecting. The study method was interviewing selected herbal practitioners and elderly people by means of a semi-structured questionnaire and focus group discussion. Out of 146 species of medicinal plants collected from the study area, herbs (41.4%) and shrubs (35.5%) constituted the highest proportion, followed by trees (16.2%) and climbers (6.9%). Out of the total of 146 medicinal plants collected 95(64.7%) were used against human disease, 32(21.9%) of medicinal plants were used against animal disease and the remaining 18% were used for the treatment of both human and animal diseases. The results showed relatively a higher proportions of plant species were found to be used for the treatments of respiratory diseases (32.8%), followed by for the treatment of miscellaneous disease conditions such as swellings/tumors, toothache, headache, etc. (20.9%), and gastrointestinal related complaints (18.4%). The most frequent methods (95.7%) of preparation of plant medicines in the studied communities were squashing/grinding of plant parts and extracting juicy ingredients. Although there is wealth of medicinal plants and traditional knowledge that has been applied in the treatment of human and lifestalk health problems, the sustainability of these heritages has been challenged increasingly by human and environmental factors. According to some respondents the traditional medicinal practices has been discouraged by modern health care system due to fear of inappropriate dosage and safety issue. Therefore in addition to documenting traditional medicinal plants and the associated knowledge, it is important to test the scientific validity of the herbal preparations to establish appropriate dosages and conduct clinical studies to ensure the safety of the traditional medicines if we are to benefit sustainably from these heritages.
Keywords
Traditional Knowledge, Medicinal Plants, Traditional Medicine, Associated Knowledge, Respondents, Herbal Practitioners
To cite this article
Zeleke Wolde Tenssay, Edigetu Merawi, Tesfaye Bekele, Binyam Goshu, Yibrahu Emishaw, Ashenafi Ayehune, Medicinal Plants:-Traditional Knowledge and Practices in Some Communities of Ethiopia, International Journal of Ecotoxicology and Ecobiology. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2017, pp. 56-60. doi: 10.11648/j.ijee.20170202.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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