Field Evaluation of Lethal Ovitraps for the Control of Dengue Vectors in Islamabad, Pakistan
International Journal of Ecotoxicology and Ecobiology
Volume 2, Issue 1, March 2017, Pages: 16-25
Received: Nov. 22, 2016; Accepted: Dec. 14, 2016; Published: Jan. 16, 2017
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Authors
Imrana Noreen, Department of Medical Entomology and Disease Vector Control, Health Services Academy, Islamabad, Pakistan
Imtinan Akram Khan, Department of Medical Entomology and Disease Vector Control, Health Services Academy, Islamabad, Pakistan
Emad Khater, Department of Medical Entomology, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt; Public Health Pests Laboratory of Jeddah Gov., Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Muhammad Naeem, Department of Entomology, PMAS-Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Pakista
Ahmad Mohammad Allam, Department of Parasitology and Animal Diseases, Veterinary Research Division, National Research Centre, Cairo, Egypt
Rizwan Ahmed, Department of Entomology, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Muhammad Mohsin, Public Health Pests Laboratory of Jeddah Gov., Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
Soaib Ali Hassan, Department of Medical Entomology and Disease Vector Control, Health Services Academy, Islamabad, Pakistan
Doaa E. Soliman, Department of Entomology, Ain Shams University, Abbassia, Cairo, Egypt
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Abstract
Limited success has been attained using long-established mosquito vector control methods to prevent dengue transmission. Integrated disease control programs making use of alternative tools, e.g. Lethal ovitraps may provide greater prospects for monitoring and reducing vector populations and disease transmission in order to provide new robust data on the efficiency of entomological surveillance methods to control important dengue and other disease vectors in Pakistan and other geographic regions. The purpose of this study was to figure out the efficiency of Lethal ovitraps in eggs collection baited with grass infusion. This study also aimed at exploring Aedes infestation indices and generation of baseline data by indoor and outdoor ovi-trapping. Field evaluation of a Lethal ovitraps containing Deltamethrin-treated strip was carried out for monitoring the dengue vector (s) Aedes mosquitoes during November-February, 2015 in Rawal Town, Islamabad, Pakistan. The study site was divided into treatment and control blocks with 20 randomly selected houses for each block. Each block received 40 Lethal ovitraps (LOs) with and without treatment. The oviposition response by Aedes mosquitoes was measured using the Ovitrap Positive Index (OPI) and the Eggs Density Index (EDI). There were six weekly eggs collections made. Which yielded 510 Aedes eggs with 32 and 478 from the treatment and the control blocks, respectively, indicating the damaging effect of Deltamethrin on the treatment group. The weekly egg collections yielded 510 Aedes eggs with 32 and 478 from the treatment and the control blocks, respectively, indicating the damaging effect of Deltamethrin on the treatment group. The OPI response of treatment and control ovitraps was different. OPI was higher in the controls than in the treatment groups. Moreover, there was a significant difference in EDI of treatment compared to control. There was complete inhibition of larvae emergence in Lethal ovitraps in comparison to the control, where 50.20% larvae were formed. The results indicated that the Lethal ovitraps proved to be a very effective tool for monitoring and controlling Aedes populations under natural conditions. Furthermore, a significant decrease in the number of eggs was obtained in the treated group. At lower operational costs and consistency, these LOs can be practically used as a benign tool for measuring infestation rates for entomological surveillance of Aedes species.
Keywords
Aedes Aegypt, Aedes Albopictus, Lethal Ovitrap, Deltamethrin, Dengue
To cite this article
Imrana Noreen, Imtinan Akram Khan, Emad Khater, Muhammad Naeem, Ahmad Mohammad Allam, Rizwan Ahmed, Muhammad Mohsin, Soaib Ali Hassan, Doaa E. Soliman, Field Evaluation of Lethal Ovitraps for the Control of Dengue Vectors in Islamabad, Pakistan, International Journal of Ecotoxicology and Ecobiology. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2017, pp. 16-25. doi: 10.11648/j.ijee.20170201.13
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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