Genetic Variability, Heritability and Genetic Advance in Bread Wheat (Triticumaestivum.L) Genotypes at Gurage Zone, Ethiopia
International Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
Volume 1, Issue 1, November 2016, Pages: 1-9
Received: Jul. 14, 2016; Accepted: Jul. 26, 2016; Published: Nov. 3, 2016
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Authors
Kifle Zerga, Department of Horticulture, College of Agriculture and Natural Resource Management, Wolkite University, Wolkite, Ethiopia
Firew Mekbib, School of Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Environmental Science, Haramaya University, Dire Dawa, Ethiopia
Tadesse Dessalegn, Department of Plant Science, College of Agriculture, Bahirdar University, Bahirdar, Ethiopia
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Abstract
In Ethiopia, a number of improved bread wheat (Triticumaestivum L.) varieties have been released by different research centers for the existence of genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance. However nothing has been done at Gurage Zone and therefore a total of twenty five bread wheat (Triticumaestivum L.) genotypes were evaluated for genetic variability, heritability and genetic advance at Gurage zone at two different environments. The genotypes were grown in randomized complete block design. Data were collected on 13 agronomic characters. Analysis of variance at each location showed highly significant (P≤ 0.01) difference for all characters, except harvest index at Fereziye, and harvest index and days to heading at Kotergedra. The combined analysis of variance over the two locations showed highly significant (P≤0.01) variations among the genotypes in all studied traits. The medium values of PCV and GCV were recorded from above ground biomass and tillers per plant across two locations. High estimates of heritability across a location were obtained in the case of spikelets per spike (98.06%), 1000 kernel weight (93.01%) and plant height (85.08%). Across location high values of genetic advance was obtained from above ground biomass (22.83%) and tillers per plant (21.61%).
Keywords
Wheat, Genetic Advance, GCV, PCV, Heritability
To cite this article
Kifle Zerga, Firew Mekbib, Tadesse Dessalegn, Genetic Variability, Heritability and Genetic Advance in Bread Wheat (Triticumaestivum.L) Genotypes at Gurage Zone, Ethiopia, International Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2016, pp. 1-9. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmb.20160101.11
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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