Changes in Body Weight Gain and Blood Hormonal Levels in Relation to Change in Age of Egyptian Male Buffaloes Calves from Birthing to Puberty
Advances in Applied Physiology
Volume 1, Issue 4, October 2016, Pages: 43-48
Received: Sep. 8, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 13, 2016; Published: Nov. 25, 2016
Views 4497      Downloads 205
Authors
Alsaied Alnaimy Mostafa Habeeb, Biological Applications Department, Radioisotopes Applications Division, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Inshas, Cairo, Egypt
Ahmed Elsayed Gad, Biological Applications Department, Radioisotopes Applications Division, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Inshas, Cairo, Egypt
Mostafa Abas Adelmonem Atta, Biological Applications Department, Radioisotopes Applications Division, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, Inshas, Cairo, Egypt
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
The objective of the present study was to determine the changes in blood hormonal levels and blood profile in relation to the change in each of age, live body weight and body weight gain of Egyptian male buffaloes calves from birthing to 24 months of age. The present study was carried out on 10 male buffalo calves from birthing until 24 months of age. The animals were weighed at birth, 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months before the morning feed and daily body weight gain (DBWG) was calculated for 0-3, 3-6, 6-12, 12-18, 18-24 and 0-24 months. During weighing the calves, 0ne blood sample from the Jugular vein of each calf was withdrawn to estimate thyroxin (T4), triiodothyronine (T3), cortisol, testosterone and aldosterone hormonal levels as well as glucose and protein fractions. Results showed that live body weight (LBW) of calves was increased gradually from birthing to reach to 592.8 kg after 24 months of age. The lowest DBWG of buffalo calves values were through the first 3 months after birthing and the period from 18-24 months of age while the highest DBWG values were during the period from 6 to 18 months of age. The highest level of T4 and T3 were at birth and decreased significantly at weaning. The lowest cortisol level was at birth while the highest cortisol value was at weaning and after 24 months of age. The highest level of aldoserone was at birth and at weaning. From 6 months of age up to 24 months, T4, T3 and aldosterone level was not affected significantly due to the change in age of calves. Testosterone level increased progressively with increase the age of buffalo calves. T4, T3 and aldosterone hormones have negative significant correlations while testosterone level has a highly positive correlation with each of age, LBW and DBG of buffalo calves. Glucose level decreased significantly with increasing the age of calves. Glucose and globulin levels have a negative significant correlation with each of age, LBW and DBG of buffalo calves. It can be concluded from this study that the changes in blood hormonal levels, especially, testosterone, T4, T3 and aldosterone as well as glucose and globulin concentrations are in relation to the change in each of age, live body weight and body weight gain of Egyptian male buffaloes calves from birth to 24 months of age.
Keywords
Buffalo, Daily Gain, Hormones, Glucose, Total Protein, Correlations
To cite this article
Alsaied Alnaimy Mostafa Habeeb, Ahmed Elsayed Gad, Mostafa Abas Adelmonem Atta, Changes in Body Weight Gain and Blood Hormonal Levels in Relation to Change in Age of Egyptian Male Buffaloes Calves from Birthing to Puberty, Advances in Applied Physiology. Vol. 1, No. 4, 2016, pp. 43-48. doi: 10.11648/j.aap.20160104.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
FAO (2000). Food and Agriculture Organization. Water Buffalo, An asset undervalued".
[2]
FAO (2002). FAO Production Year Book Vol. 56. Food and Agricultural Organization, Rome, Italy.
[3]
El-Nahas, S.; F. Abdel-Tawab; M. Zahran; S. Soussa; M. Rashed and S. Ali (1998). Gene Mapping of River Buffalo by Somatic Cell Hybridization. Egypt. J. Genet. Cytol. 27, 169-177.
[4]
FAO (2008). Food and Agricultural Organization of United Nations: Economic And Social Department: The Statistical Division.
[5]
Habeeb, A. A. M.; I. F. M. Marai and T. H. Kamal (1992). Heat stress, Chapter 2 In: Farm Animals and the Environment, edited by Philips and D. Piggins, Commonwealth Agriculture Bureau International, United Kingdom, 27-47.
[6]
Garg, S. L.; S. Sharma, M. K. Rose and V. K. Agarwal (2002). Age associated. Indian J, Anim. Sci., 72 (7):579-581.
[7]
Ingole, S. D., B. T. Deshmukh, A. S. Nagvekar and S. V. Bharucha (2012). Serum Profile of Thyroid Hormones from Birth to Puberty in Buffalo Calves and Heifers. Journal of Buffalo Science, 1(1), 39-49.
[8]
Goeritz F., M. Quest, A. Wagener, M. Fassbender, A. Broich, T. B. Hildebrandt, R. R. Hofmann and S. Blottner (2003). Seasonal timing of sperm production in roe deer: interrelationship among changes in ejaculate parameters, morphology and function of testis and accessory glands. Theriogenology.; 59: 1487 –1502.
[9]
A. O. A. C. (1990). Association of official analytical chemists. Official methods of analysis. 5th Edition, Washington, D. C., USA.
[10]
SAS (1996). SAS/ STAT User's Guide. (Version 6, 4th Ed.). SAS Inst. Inc., Cary, NC.
[11]
Duncan, D. B. (1955). Multiple range and multiple F-test. Biometrics, 11: 1-42.
[12]
Habeeb, A. A. M.; H. M. Yousef; S. M. Zahed and A. I. Aboulnaga (1997). T3, cortisol and testosteronne levels and some physiological parameters in relation to age and body weight in male buffaloes. Annals of Agriculture Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Moshtohor, Banha University, 35: 2003-2011.
[13]
Eshratkhah B., R. Beheshti, M. R. S. Nahand, M. Sadaghian and S. M. R. Taj (2010). Variations of Plasma Thyroid Hormones Concentrations and Their Percentages During Different Ages of Sarabi Calves Global Veterinaria 4 (4): 357-361, 2010.
[14]
Ingole, S. D., B. T. Deshmukh, A. S. Nagvekar and S. V. Bharucha (2012). Serum Profile of Thyroid Hormones from Birth to Puberty in Buffalo Calves and Heifers. Journal of Buffalo Science, 1(1), 39-49.
[15]
Knowles, T. G., Edwards, J. E., Bazeley, K. J., Brown, S. N., Butterworth, A., Warriss, P. D. (2000). Changes in the blood biochemical and haematological profile of neonatal calves with age. Veterinary Record, 147(21): 593–598.
[16]
Malfatti, A., O. Barbato, L. Todini, G. M. Terzano, A. Debenedetti and A. Borghese (2006). Blood testosterone levels in Italian Mediterranean buffalo bulls managed in two different breeding conditions. Theriogenology, 65 (6):1137-1144.
[17]
Matsuzaki S., Y. Uenoyam, K. Okuda, G. Watanabe, N. Kitamura, K. Tayta and J. Yamada (2000). Age-related changes in the serum levels of inhibin, FSH, LH and testosterone in Holstein bulls. J. Reprod. Develop.; 46: 245–248.
[18]
Habeeb, A. A. M.; H. M. Yousef; S. M. Zahed and A. I. Aboulnaga (1997). T3, cortisol and testosteronne levels and some physiological parameters in relation to age and body weight in male buffaloes. Annals of Agriculture Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Moshtohor, Banha University, 35: 2003-2011.
[19]
Habbeb, A. A. M.; A. I. Aboulnaga and T. H. Kamal (2001). Heat-induced changes in body water concentration, T3, cortisol, glucose and cholesterol levels and their relationships with thermoneutral body weight gain in Friesian calves. 2nd Intern. Conf. on Anim. Prod. & Health in Semi Aried area,Fac. of Environ. Agric. Sci., Suez Canal Univ., El-Arish, North Sinai, Egypt., 97-108.
[20]
Mohri, M., K. Sharifi and S. Eidi (2007). Hematology and serum biochemistry of Holstein dairy calves: Age related changes and comparison with blood composition in adults. Research in Veterinary Science 83 (1) 30–39.
[21]
Delgadillo, J. A. and Chemineau, P. (1992). Abolition of the seasonal release of luteinizing hormone and testosterone in Alpine male goats (Capra hircus) by short photoperiodic cycles. J. Reprod. Fertil. 94, 45-55.
[22]
Al-Qarawi A. A., H. M. Omar, H. A. Abdel-Rahman, S. A. El-Mougy and M. S. El-Belely (2004). Trypanosomiasis-induced infertility in dromedary (Camelus dromedarius) bulls: changes in plasma steroids concentration and semen characteristics. Anim. Reprod. Sci.; 84: 73–82.
[23]
Bezerra F. Q. G.; C. R. Aguiar Filho; L. M. Freitas Neto; E. R. Santos Junior; R. M. Chaves; E. M. P. Azevedo; M. H. B. Santos; P. F. Lima and M. A. L. Oliveira (2009). Body weight, scrotal circumference and testosterone concentration in young Boer goat males born during the dry or rainy seasons. South African Journal of Animal Science, 39 (Issue 4):301-306.
[24]
Silva, S. C. B. (2000). Caracterizapao Histologica e seminal do desenvolvimento sexual de caprinos Saanen, criados em sistema intensive. MSc thesis, Univemild seasonidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186