Malaria Parasitaemia and Changes in Follicle Stimulating Hormone and Luteinizing Hormone Levels of Adult Mice
Advances in Applied Physiology
Volume 5, Issue 1, June 2020, Pages: 1-5
Received: Feb. 19, 2020; Accepted: Mar. 26, 2020; Published: Apr. 14, 2020
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Authors
Naiho Alexander Obidike, Department of Human Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Delta State University, Abraka, Delta State, Nigeria
Ebite Lilian Ozokor, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Delta State University, Abraka, Delta State, Nigeria
Ovuakporaye Simon Irikefe, Department of Human Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Delta State University, Abraka, Delta State, Nigeria
Gbagbeke Kelvin Obakore, Department of Human Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Delta State University, Abraka, Delta State, Nigeria
Kelechi Keneth Anachuna, Department of Human Physiology, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Delta State University, Abraka, Delta State, Nigeria
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Abstract
To understand the treatment of malaria, it is important to understand the effect of the administration of specific anti-malarials on various physiological variables. Current study investigated the effect (s) of the anti-malarial, coartem and co-administration of the antioxidant, Vitamin E on the levels of Luteinising and Follicle Stimulating Hormones [LH and FSH] of malaria parasite infected mice. Twenty-eight (28) adult mice were obtained, acclimatized for two (2) weeks and randomly selected into four (4) groups of seven (7) rats per group. Group 1 (Control) received standard mice diet and water ad libitum, while group 2 mice were infected with malaria (Plasmodium berghei) and left untreated. Groups 3 and 4 were inoculated with malaria (Plasmodium berghei); then treated with coartem and coartem + vitamin E respectively. After three (3) weeks of administration of test substance, the mice blood samples were obtained from mice (for each group) and assayed for serum FSH and LH levels. Statistical comparison was then conducted (using the student t-test) against those of control group to ascertain the effects of the changes due to coartem and/or antioxidant vitamin E co-administration to plasmodium berghei infected mice. Study found a statistically significant increase in serum LH levels of male mice after inoculation with plasmodium berghei. This decrease was noticed more even with coartem and antioxidant vitamin E co-administration, implicative of a possible effect in fecundity levels of infected male mice. The level of FSH was significantly increased in infected mice, but however showed a reversal following treatment with coartem and/or antioxidant vitamin E. The effects on reproductive hormones seen here may mirror the effects in man. More studies are needed to elucidate that.
Keywords
Coartem, Leutinizing Hormone, Follicle Stimulating Hormone
To cite this article
Naiho Alexander Obidike, Ebite Lilian Ozokor, Ovuakporaye Simon Irikefe, Gbagbeke Kelvin Obakore, Kelechi Keneth Anachuna, Malaria Parasitaemia and Changes in Follicle Stimulating Hormone and Luteinizing Hormone Levels of Adult Mice, Advances in Applied Physiology. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2020, pp. 1-5. doi: 10.11648/j.aap.20200501.11
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Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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