Strengthening Women’s Participation in the Sustainable Management of the Bimbia-Bonadikombo Community Forest of Cameroon: Challenges and Blueprints
International Journal of Sustainable Development Research
Volume 2, Issue 3, May 2016, Pages: 12-17
Received: Sep. 5, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 12, 2016; Published: Oct. 21, 2016
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Authors
Fondufe Sakah Lydia, Department of Geography & Environmental Studies, Catholic University of Cameroon (CATUC), Bamenda, Cameroon
Jude Ndzifon Kimengsi, Department of Geography & Environmental Studies, Catholic University of Cameroon (CATUC), Bamenda, Cameroon
Akhere Solange Gwan, Department of Sociology & Human Geography, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway
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Abstract
Much emphasis has been placed on the issue of community forest management due to the important role forests play in climate change mitigation, watershed protection and the provision of other valuable resources to mankind, among others. Varied opinions exist on the role of women in the management of the forest. Significant research attention has been given to issues of forest governance and management challenges in Cameroon have been researched upon including forest conservation and poverty alleviation. In addition, the role and challenges of women in resource conservation including forests have been investigated with the conclusions pointing to the fact that the role of women in the management of these resources is still weak. Although the conclusions from previous studies point to the fact that there is a need to improve women’s role in forest resource management, very little has been done to investigate ways of stepping up women’s participation in community forest management. This study made use of field investigation and the interview of 50 inhabitants, including authorities of the Bimbia Bonadikombo Natural Resource Management Council (BBNRMC) to examine the opportunities, challenges and blueprints involved in strengthening women participation for the sustainable management of the Bimbia Bonadikombo community forest of Cameroon. The results show that women are yet to be given their full opportunities to participate in the management of the BBCF. Major challenges to women participation include tradition and culture. It was equally noticed that most of the women view forest management as a tedious exercise which should be reserved for men.
Keywords
Women Participation, Sustainable Forest Management, Bimbia-Bonadikombo Community Forest, Opportunities, Challenges and Blueprints
To cite this article
Fondufe Sakah Lydia, Jude Ndzifon Kimengsi, Akhere Solange Gwan, Strengthening Women’s Participation in the Sustainable Management of the Bimbia-Bonadikombo Community Forest of Cameroon: Challenges and Blueprints, International Journal of Sustainable Development Research. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2016, pp. 12-17. doi: 10.11648/j.ijsdr.20160204.11
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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