Neonatal Emergencies in Full-term Infants: A Seasonal Description in a Paediatric Referral Hospital of Yaoundé, Cameroon
American Journal of Pediatrics
Volume 6, Issue 2, June 2020, Pages: 87-90
Received: Feb. 9, 2020; Accepted: Feb. 19, 2020; Published: Mar. 6, 2020
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Authors
Georges Pius Kamsu Moyo, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoudé, Cameroo
Donleine Sobguemezing, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoudé, Cameroo
Hélène Tetinou Adjifack, Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoudé, Cameroo
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Abstract
Background: A neonatal emergency may be defined as a potentially life-threatening disorder or anomaly which occurs within the first 28 days after birth. From an epidemiological stand point, some disorders may be specific to this period and so their knowledge may improve the management and be life-saving. Objective: To determine the various neonatal emergencies. Methodology: We carried out a cross-sectional study with prospective and exhaustive recruitment of full-term neonates presenting emergencies at the Mother and Child Centre of the Chantal Biya Foundation. The study lasted for 4 months and was conducted from September to December 2018 in Yaoundé, Cameroon. Results: The survey covered 235 neonatal emergencies, 28 (11.9%) were surgical emergencies, 207 (88%) were medical emergencies and 12 (5.1%) neonates had mixed emergencies. Most cases 137 (58.2%) occurred within the first week of life, the leading causes were sepsis 147 (62.5%), birth asphyxia 25 (10.6%) and jaundice 18 (7.6%). The death rate was 3.4% (08) mainly due to congenital malformations 50% (04) while 213 (90.6%) cases recovered. Conclusion: The leading causes of neonatal emergencies found in this study were not very different from those described in the literature and so prompt diagnosis and management may further improve the outcome of neonatal emergencies, with most neonates recovering.
Keywords
Neonate, Emergency, Cameroon
To cite this article
Georges Pius Kamsu Moyo, Donleine Sobguemezing, Hélène Tetinou Adjifack, Neonatal Emergencies in Full-term Infants: A Seasonal Description in a Paediatric Referral Hospital of Yaoundé, Cameroon, American Journal of Pediatrics. Vol. 6, No. 2, 2020, pp. 87-90. doi: 10.11648/j.ajp.20200602.13
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Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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