Risk Factors of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of Newborn (PPHN) in Different Gestation
American Journal of Pediatrics
Volume 5, Issue 3, September 2019, Pages: 142-147
Received: Jun. 14, 2019; Accepted: Jul. 15, 2019; Published: Aug. 12, 2019
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Authors
Nargis Ara Begum, Department of Neonatology, United Hospital Limited, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Sharmin Afroze, Department of Neonatology, Dr. M R Khan Shishu (Children) Hospital & Institute of Child Health, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Runa Laila, Department of Neonatology, United Hospital Limited, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Shahnaz Parvin Siddiqua, Department of Neonatology, United Hospital Limited, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Mohammad Toyobur Rahaman, Department of Neonatology, United Hospital Limited, Dhaka, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of Newborn (PPHN) is a critical neonatal problem resulting from failed circulatory adaptation at birth, associated with substantial perinatal morbidity as well as mortality. Despite significant advancement in management of PPHN across the globe, it still remains a challenge especially in developing countries like Bangladesh. So the study was conducted over five years in United Hospital Limited to determine the risk factors of PPHN in relation to gestational age. All PPHN cases diagnosed by echocardiogram were included in the study and divided into term (≥ 37 wks) and preterm group (<37 wks). Among 157 of PPHN cases, 66% were male, 59% were preterm, mean gestational age and birth weight were 35.6 ± 2.54 wks and 2598.22 ± 760.353 gm respectively. Maternal asthma (p 0.01) and pre-eclamptic toxemia (p 0.010) were significant risk factors for persistent pulmonary hypertension of newborn. PPHN was found high in neonates with Respiratory Distress Syndrome (p 0.000) and Meconium Aspiration Syndrome (p 0.000). Most (96%) of the babies were discharged to home.
Keywords
Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension, Risk Factors, Persistent Fetal Circulation
To cite this article
Nargis Ara Begum, Sharmin Afroze, Runa Laila, Shahnaz Parvin Siddiqua, Mohammad Toyobur Rahaman, Risk Factors of Persistent Pulmonary Hypertension of Newborn (PPHN) in Different Gestation, American Journal of Pediatrics. Vol. 5, No. 3, 2019, pp. 142-147. doi: 10.11648/j.ajp.20190503.20
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Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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