Assessment of the Teaching of Pattern Making and Freehand Cutting Skills in Ghanaian Senior Secondary Schools
International Journal of Vocational Education and Training Research
Volume 4, Issue 1, June 2018, Pages: 8-12
Received: Feb. 11, 2018; Accepted: Mar. 19, 2018; Published: Apr. 10, 2018
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Authors
Modesta Efua Gavor, Department of Vocational and Technical Education, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana
Patience Asieduah Danquah, Department of Vocational and Technical Education, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana
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Abstract
The purpose of the study was to investigate the extent to which the content of freehand cutting and patternmaking are covered in the Senior High Schools (SHSs). All clothing students enrolled in the clothing and textiles option of the Home Economics programme at the University of Cape Coast for the 2015/2016 academic year were used for the study. A questionnaire was used to collect the needed information. The data for the study were analysed with the help of descriptive statistics. Results of the study indicate that although what freehand cutting means together with its advantages and disadvantages are being taught in Ghanaian SHSs, very few students are exposed to the practical skill of freehand cutting. The results also show that although attention is paid to drafting of basic blocks very little attention is given to adaptations for various designs. At the West African Certificate examinations level although questions are set on the skill of patternmaking no questions are set on the practical aspect of freehand cutting. It is suggested that much attention is given to the teaching of freehand cutting at SHS. In addition, more books on freehand cutting should be written to encourage its teaching at the SHS levels in Ghana.
Keywords
Pattern Making, Freehand Cutting, Teaching, Secondary School
To cite this article
Modesta Efua Gavor, Patience Asieduah Danquah, Assessment of the Teaching of Pattern Making and Freehand Cutting Skills in Ghanaian Senior Secondary Schools, International Journal of Vocational Education and Training Research. Vol. 4, No. 1, 2018, pp. 8-12. doi: 10.11648/j.ijvetr.20180401.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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