The Development of the Values Education in Vocational High School in Indonesia
International Journal of Vocational Education and Training Research
Volume 1, Issue 1, June 2015, Pages: 1-4
Received: Jun. 4, 2015; Accepted: Jun. 24, 2015; Published: Jun. 25, 2015
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Authors
Puji Iswanto, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Negeri Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia
C. Rudy Prihantoro, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Negeri Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia
Ratu Amilia Avianti, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universitas Negeri Jakarta, Jakarta, Indonesia
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Abstract
Writing this paper aims to discuss the values of vocational education the right was developed in vocational high school. So that vocational high school have character innovative, creative, productive, competitively, and grow a sustainable future front as well as the principles, policies, strategies and challenges development of the values education in vocational high schools. Development of the value education in vocational high schools are required to build professional values education continuing vocational future. The value education of vocational build independence rational learners to find maximum benefit, the vocational high schools can learn from global values to develop local values and support the development of locally in the context of globalization. In doing uptake of global value, vocational high schools are advised to use the three theories, namely: (1) the theory of trees, (2) the theory of crystal, (3) the theory of the bird cage.
Keywords
Development, Education, Vocational High School, Values Education
To cite this article
Puji Iswanto, C. Rudy Prihantoro, Ratu Amilia Avianti, The Development of the Values Education in Vocational High School in Indonesia, International Journal of Vocational Education and Training Research. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2015, pp. 1-4. doi: 10.11648/j.ijvetr.20150101.11
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