Extraction, Characterization and Dextrinization of Starch from Six (6) Varieties of Tubers from Iwo Osun State Nigeria for Application in the Production of Adhesives
American Journal of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering
Volume 3, Issue 2, December 2019, Pages: 7-11
Received: Sep. 17, 2019; Accepted: Oct. 9, 2019; Published: Dec. 4, 2019
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Authors
Oluwatobi David Adekunle, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, Bowen University, Iwo, Nigeria
Omiye Mobolaji Kayode, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, Bowen University, Iwo, Nigeria
Oluwatoyin Kemi Awoyale, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, Bowen University, Iwo, Nigeria
Modupe Dawodu, Department of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, Bowen University, Iwo, Nigeria
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Abstract
Tuber crops are widely consumed; they come in various varieties with great nutritional and non- nutritional values. They are very rich in starch. The starch content of each of the six varieties of Nigerian tubers was determined, each of the tubers was wet fractionated in the laboratory and the starch was recovered. The composition of the tubers (dry matter, protein, ash and mineral content) and starch isolation (moisture, starch, protein, phosphorus, fat and carbohydrate) were determined. Substantial differences in the starch content of the tubers were observed. The dry starch recovery ranged from 10.20% to 18.30% and the wet starch recovery ranged from 15.70-32.40%. Moisture content ranged from 13-15.80%, viscosity 275.08 -382.33. The carbohydrate, ash, fat and protein content of the six varieties of the tubers vary from 45% to 53.8%, 1.0 to 2.0%, 19.56 to 21.99% and 10.96-14.29% respectively. All six starches were insoluble in water and ethanol and proved positive to iodine and Fehling’s test. Extracted starch was dextrinated using 0.1M and 0.2M HCl separately at 160 and 100°C to obtain yellow dextrin and white dextrin respectively which were soluble in water. Modified starches were formulated into adhesives. Results obtained indicated satisfactory strength for the adhesives. Thus starches suitable for the production of adhesives were obtained.
Keywords
Dextrinization, Starch, Tuber, Adhesive
To cite this article
Oluwatobi David Adekunle, Omiye Mobolaji Kayode, Oluwatoyin Kemi Awoyale, Modupe Dawodu, Extraction, Characterization and Dextrinization of Starch from Six (6) Varieties of Tubers from Iwo Osun State Nigeria for Application in the Production of Adhesives, American Journal of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2019, pp. 7-11. doi: 10.11648/j.ajcbe.20190302.11
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Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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