Patient Delay and Associated Factors Among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients at Hadiya Zone Public Health Facilities in South Ethiopia, 2017
European Journal of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences
Volume 4, Issue 4, August 2018, Pages: 55-62
Received: Sep. 6, 2018; Accepted: Oct. 4, 2018; Published: Nov. 5, 2018
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Authors
Gedeyon Getahun, Hadiya Zone Health Department, Hossana, Ethiopia
Belay Erchafo, Department of Public Health, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, Wachemo University, Hossana, Ethiopia
Lakew Abebe Gebretsadik, Department of Health Education and Behavioral Science, Institute of Health, Faculity of Public Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Mulugeta Chaka, Department of Health Education and Behavioral Science, Institute of Health, Faculity of Public Health, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Early diagnosis and immediate initiation of treatment are essential for an effective TB control program. Delay in treatment is significant to both disease prognoses at the individual level and within the community. Patient delay and associated factors were assessed among pulmonary tuberculosis patients who are on treatment for the first two months at Hadiya zone public health facilities, south Ethiopia, 2017. Facility based cross sectional study triangulated by Qualitative study was employed on 340 Pulmonary Tuberculosis patients from March 10-April 20, 2017. Simple random sampling technique was used to select study health facility. Directly Observed Treatment Short-course User at the beginning of data collection was consecutively recruited in to the study until the intended 340 sample sizes were fulfilled. Data was collected from the participants using a pretested structured interviewer administered questionnaire. Multivariable binary Logistic regressions were used to identify independent predictors of Tuberculosis treatment delay for those variables which are candidate in bivariate analysis. A P-value < 0.05 at 95 % confidence intervals was considered statistical significance between dependent and predictors variables. Three hundred and Forty PTB patients with a response rate of 97.7% were enrolled from seven diagnostics and treatment centers. Among 340 Pulmonary Tuberculosis patients enrolled in the study, of which 49.1% experienced patient delay. The median patient delay was 31. Unable to read and write, Poor knowledge of Tuberculosis (AOR 3.96, 95% CI (2.286.86), self-treatment (AOR: 2, 95% CI (1.143.93), and financial constraint (AOR: 2.092, 95% CI (1.113.945) were the independent predictors of patient delay. Nearly half of the patients seek their first consultation after thirty days cut-off point. Unable to read and write, Poor knowledge of Tuberculosis, self-treatment and financial constraints were found to have association with patient delay. This may lead to continues existence of Tuberculosis cases which probably leads to the emergence of multiple drugs resistant. Implementation of well-designed information education, communication/behavioral change communication strategy for Tuberculosis control program to overcome high prevalence of patient delay.
Keywords
Tuberculosis Treatment Delay, Pulmonary Tuberculosis, Patient Delay, Hadiya Zone, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Gedeyon Getahun, Belay Erchafo, Lakew Abebe Gebretsadik, Mulugeta Chaka, Patient Delay and Associated Factors Among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients at Hadiya Zone Public Health Facilities in South Ethiopia, 2017, European Journal of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2018, pp. 55-62. doi: 10.11648/j.ejcbs.20180404.11
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Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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