Gender Differences in Types and Frequencies of Coronary Artery Anomalies and Myocardial Bridge in 10,457 Chinese Undergoing 320-Slice Computed Tomography
European Journal of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences
Volume 2, Issue 3, June 2016, Pages: 14-22
Received: Sep. 8, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 12, 2016; Published: Oct. 28, 2016
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Authors
Suhua Li, Department of Cardiology, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
Xixiang Tang, Advanced Medical Center, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
Yanting Luo, Department of Cardiology, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
Long Peng, Department of Cardiology, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
Yunyue Zhao, Department of Cardiology, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
Jieming Zhu, Department of Cardiology, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
Lin Chen, Department of Cardiology, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
Ruimin Dong, Department of Cardiology, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
Yanming Chen, Advanced Medical Center, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
Jinlai Liu, Department of Cardiology, the Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
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Abstract
Varied frequencies of coronary artery anomalies (CAAs) and myocardial bridge (MB) exist in previous studies. Race and gender may play a role. The present study aimed to investigate the gender differences in types and frequencies of coronary artery anomalies (CAAs) and myocardial bridge (MB) in Chinese undergoing 320-slice coronary computed tomography. The authors assessed prospectively the records of 10,457 consecutive patients who underwent 320-slice coronary computed tomography for any reason. CAAs were divided into 4 groups: 1) Anomalies of origination; 2) Anomalies of intrinsic coronary arterial anatomy; 3) fistula; 4) Number anomalies. Clinical relevance based classifications of CAAs (Class I-Benign; II-Relevant; III-Severe; IV-Critical) were also presented. Types and frequencies of CAAs and MB were compared between males and females. The overall prevalence of CAAs was 2.60% in our study, involving 0.62% of anomalies of origination, 1.72% of anomalies of intrinsic coronary arterial anatomy, 0.23% of fistula, and 0.04% of number anomalies. Gender differences were not presented in the frequencies of the majority of CAAs (p>0.05). However, males were more likely to have LCX originating from the right sinus of Valsalva when compared with females (0.11% vs. 0.01%, p=0.027). There was no difference of clinical relevance based classifications of CAAs between males and females (p>0.05). The prevalence of MB was 33.15% (3466/10,475) in total. Higher frequency (19.13% vs. 14.0%, p<0.001) and longer average length (16.89±8.58mm vs. 13.71±8.50mm, p<0.001) of MB were observed in males than those in females; while the distribution and the mean depth of MB were similar in males and females (p>0.05). In conclusion, LCX originating from the right sinus of Valsalva and MB with longer average length occurred more frequently in Chinese males than females.
Keywords
Computed Tomography Angiography, Coronary Artery Anomaly, Myocardial Bridge, Fistula, Coronary Hypoplasia
To cite this article
Suhua Li, Xixiang Tang, Yanting Luo, Long Peng, Yunyue Zhao, Jieming Zhu, Lin Chen, Ruimin Dong, Yanming Chen, Jinlai Liu, Gender Differences in Types and Frequencies of Coronary Artery Anomalies and Myocardial Bridge in 10,457 Chinese Undergoing 320-Slice Computed Tomography, European Journal of Clinical and Biomedical Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2016, pp. 14-22. doi: 10.11648/j.ejcbs.20160203.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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