Epidemiological Study of Brain Tumours Incidence in Sudan During 2014-2017
Journal of Health and Environmental Research
Volume 3, Issue 4, August 2017, Pages: 57-61
Received: Jul. 13, 2017; Accepted: Aug. 3, 2017; Published: Sep. 26, 2017
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Authors
Mohammed Ahmed Ali Omer, College of Applied Medical Science, Department of Radiologic Technology, Qassim University, Buraidah, KSA; Department of Radiotherapy & Nuclear Medicine, College of Medical Radiologic Science, Sudan University of Science and Technology, Khartoum, Sudan
Ali Bashir Ali Elhaj, Department of Radiotherapy & Nuclear Medicine, College of Medical Radiologic Science, Sudan University of Science and Technology, Khartoum, Sudan
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to highlight the epidemiology of brain tumors (BTs) in Sudan during 2014-2017 as retrospective and surveyed questionnaire collected data method. The data (annual incidence, frequencies of BTs based on gender and age, anatomical location, pathologies and geographical distribution) analyzed using EXCEL software which revealed that: BTs increase annually by a factor of 7.2% and predominant among male with 57.1%. The involved anatomical brain sites were midbrain 35%, left brain (30%) and right brain (24%). BTs observed among age groups of 1-10 years old for both gender with increasing similar trend incidence following aging which peaking at 55-65 years old. The common pathologies of brain were atrophy and infarction that represents 13.8% and 7.2% respectively and benign and malignant tumors represented (19.8%) and (34.4%) respectively. The most endemic sectors by BTs were central and Northern of Sudan that represented 45% and 35% respectively, then eastern and southern of Sudan that represented 12% and 8% respectively.
Keywords
Brain-Tumors, Epidemiology, Incidence, Radiation
To cite this article
Mohammed Ahmed Ali Omer, Ali Bashir Ali Elhaj, Epidemiological Study of Brain Tumours Incidence in Sudan During 2014-2017, Journal of Health and Environmental Research. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2017, pp. 57-61. doi: 10.11648/j.jher.20170304.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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