In-vitro Antimicrobial, Anti-oxidant Activities and Cytotoxicty of Carum carvi L
American Journal of Heterocyclic Chemistry
Volume 3, Issue 3, June 2017, Pages: 23-27
Received: Feb. 28, 2017; Accepted: Apr. 19, 2017; Published: Jul. 25, 2017
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Authors
Mohamed N. Abdalaziz, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan; Medicinal and Aromatic Plants and Traditional Medicine Research Institute (MAPTMRI), National Center for Research, Khartoum, Sudan
Mahmoud Mohamed Ali, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
Mohamed I. Garbi, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
Mohammed Abdalbagi Dafalla, Medicinal and Aromatic Plants and Traditional Medicine Research Institute (MAPTMRI), National Center for Research, Khartoum, Sudan
Ahmed S. Kabbashi, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan; Medicinal and Aromatic Plants and Traditional Medicine Research Institute (MAPTMRI), National Center for Research, Khartoum, Sudan
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Abstract
Carum carvi L. was used traditionally in different populations for many medical complains. The study was aimed to investigate antimicrobial, anti-oxidant activities and cytotoxicty of fixed oil of Carum carvi L. (seeds). The oil was extraction by petroleum ether (60-80°C) using a Soxhlet apparatus. The oil of Carum carvi L. seeds were tested against four standard bacterial species: two Gram-positive bacteria viz, Bacillus subtilis (NCTC 8236) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), two Gram-negative bacterial strains Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), and fungal strains viz, Candida albicans (ATCC 7596) using the disc diffusion method. The antioxidant activities were conducted via DPPH radical scavenging assay and cytotoxicty using brine shrimp assay. Antimicrobial activity of fixed oil of C. carvi L. dissolved in methanol (1:10), showed high activity against the Gram-negative bacteria (P. aeruginosa & E. coli) (18 & 14 mm). It also showed against Gram positive bacteria (S. aureus & B.subtilis) (14 & 13 mm) and against (C. albicans) (14 mm). The tested anti-oxidant activity gave (18±0.06 RSA %) in comparison to the control of propylgalate (92±0.01 RSA %). In addition cytotoxicity (brine shrimp lethality Bioassay) verified the safety of the examined extract with an IC50 less than 1000μg/ml. This study conducted for essential oil of C. carvi L. seeds proved to have potent activities against antimicrobial activity In-vitro with verified safety evidence for use.
Keywords
Carum carvi L., Antimicrobial Activity, Anti-Oxidant Activity, Cytoxicity (Brine Shrimp)
To cite this article
Mohamed N. Abdalaziz, Mahmoud Mohamed Ali, Mohamed I. Garbi, Mohammed Abdalbagi Dafalla, Ahmed S. Kabbashi, In-vitro Antimicrobial, Anti-oxidant Activities and Cytotoxicty of Carum carvi L, American Journal of Heterocyclic Chemistry. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2017, pp. 23-27. doi: 10.11648/j.ajhc.20170303.11
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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