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Physico-chemical Study of Effluents of Pharmaceutical Industries of Hyderabad Division Sindh Pakistan
International Journal of Environmental Chemistry
Volume 1, Issue 2, December 2017, Pages: 28-31
Received: Jun. 13, 2017; Accepted: Jul. 4, 2017; Published: Jul. 31, 2017
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Authors
Muhammad Ali Bhatti, Centre of Environmental Sciences, University of Sindh Jamshoro, Jamshoro, Pakistan
Khalida Faryal Almani, Centre of Environmental Sciences, University of Sindh Jamshoro, Jamshoro, Pakistan
Ghulam Murtaza Mastoi, Institute of Advanced Research Studies in Chemical Sciences, University of Sindh Jamshoro, Jamshoro, Pakistan
Muhammad Amin Qureshi, Centre of Environmental Sciences, University of Sindh Jamshoro, Jamshoro, Pakistan
Muhammad Murtaza Qureshi, Institute of Advanced Research Studies in Chemical Sciences, University of Sindh Jamshoro, Jamshoro, Pakistan
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Abstract
The Pakistan Pharmaceutical Industry is one of indispensable industries of this country. This industry manufactures very important life saving as well as life-enhancing medicines. This industry produces a wide variety of chemical products which are consist of antibiotics, analgesics, disinfectants, anesthetics, muscle relaxants, water soluble salts,, anti-clotting agents, cardiovascular medicines and vitamin in different forms like tablets, capsules, ampoules, syrups. This industry plays the role of life saving institute. At the same time this huge industry has been witnessed a source of liquid pollution, if run without treatment plant or proper disposable measures. Present study of effluents of selected Pharmaceutical industries of Hyderabad Division was conducted. Total five industries were brought under study of Hyderabad and Jamshoro site area. Sampling was done on monthly basis during the year 2015. Samples were analyzed for Physico-chemical parameters. The results were compared with National Environmental Quality Standard (NEQS) for municipal and liquid industrial effluent of Pakistan. The average ranging results of studied parameters were found as pH (4.64 – 7.74), E. C (1072 – 3021 µs/cm), salinity (0.6 – 1.5 ppt), TDS (684.1 – 2126.4 mg/L), Chlorides (86.83 – 1136.122 mg/L), Alkalinity (740.64 – 1491.2 mg/L), Hardness (125 – 346 mg/L), Sodium (30.08 – 69.18 mg/L), Potassium (47.49 – 66.96 mg/L), Calcium (140.06 – 185.4 mg/L), Magnesium (23.022 – 39.574 mg/L), Lead (0.0164 – 0.018 mg/L), Copper (2.328 – 2.984) and Zinc (0.0398 – 0.0448 mg/l). The concentration of pH, TDS, Zn and Pb, except Copper, of industrial effluents was found within permissible limits of NEQS for municipal and liquid industrial effluent of Pakistan.
Keywords
Pharmaceutical, Effluents, Hyderabad
To cite this article
Muhammad Ali Bhatti, Khalida Faryal Almani, Ghulam Murtaza Mastoi, Muhammad Amin Qureshi, Muhammad Murtaza Qureshi, Physico-chemical Study of Effluents of Pharmaceutical Industries of Hyderabad Division Sindh Pakistan, International Journal of Environmental Chemistry. Vol. 1, No. 2, 2017, pp. 28-31. doi: 10.11648/j.ijec.20170102.12
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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