Managerial Factors Affecting the Provision of Quality Sexually Transmitted Infections Primary Health Care Service in El-Damazin, Sudan 2015-2016
World Journal of Public Health
Volume 3, Issue 4, December 2018, Pages: 131-135
Received: Sep. 22, 2018; Accepted: Dec. 25, 2018; Published: Jan. 18, 2019
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Authors
Khalid Fadl Alla Khalid, HIV Prevention Program, United Nations Population Fund, Khartoum, Sudan
Nada Jafar Osman, Directorate General of Primary Health Care, Federal Ministry of Health, Khartoum, Sudan
Malaz Elbashir Ahmed, HIV Prevention Program, United Nations Population Fund, Khartoum, Sudan
Rania Hassan Abdelgfour, HIV Prevention Program, United Nations Population Fund, Khartoum, Sudan
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Abstract
Provision of quality health care service is the product of cooperation between the patient and the healthcare provider (HCP) in a supportive environment. The efficiency of STIs health program requires proper management and efficient use of resources. In Sudan the STIs services are provided as part of PHC service package. The management and responsibility for PHC centers is decentralized to state and locality levels. This study investigated the managerial factors at health care system , and care provision levels that affect the provision of quality STIs service, and consequently the utilization of STIs health service, in El-Damazin locality at Blue Nile state (BNS), 2015- 2016. The study design was descriptive cross-sectional facility-based applying qualitative research method. Purposive sampling technique was applied for health program managers at state ministry of health (SAP coordinator, RH coordinator and the manager of curative medicine department) and the care providers at all primary health centers in El-damazin locality (total of eight centers and ten care providers). Both content and framework analysis was performed. The following findings were identified by the program managers as barriers to the provision of STI services: the verticality state AIDS program (SAP) and reproductive health program (RH), ineffective coordination between both SAP, RH, and the curative medicine department, and inadequate financial & technical resources. The STIs were reflected in the annual plans, however not prioritized and budgeted. The care providers were not following the standard STI syndromic management protocols, they identified the lack of treatment protocol tools, and no recent trainings on STIs were the main barriers to provide quality services. In addition, the care providers indicated low health seeking of the surrounding communities for STI. It is recommended that proper advocacy on the importance of STI, in addition to effective coordination between the relevant programs at ministry of health should be activated, and are mandatory to ensure proper technical and financial resource mobilization which consequently will yield into provision of quality management of STI program. Moreover, care providers are required to be equipped with the necessary skills and tools in order to provide high quality syndromic management of STIs.
Keywords
Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs), Management Approaches, Utilization of STIs Health Service, Service Provision Modalities, Quality Services, Ineffective Coordination, Resources, Verticality
To cite this article
Khalid Fadl Alla Khalid, Nada Jafar Osman, Malaz Elbashir Ahmed, Rania Hassan Abdelgfour, Managerial Factors Affecting the Provision of Quality Sexually Transmitted Infections Primary Health Care Service in El-Damazin, Sudan 2015-2016, World Journal of Public Health. Vol. 3, No. 4, 2018, pp. 131-135. doi: 10.11648/j.wjph.20180304.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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