Jaggery and Tea Workers Perceptions on the Use of ITNs in Prevention of Malaria in South Mugirango Sub- County, Kisii County, Kenya
World Journal of Public Health
Volume 3, Issue 1, March 2018, Pages: 1-8
Received: Nov. 18, 2017; Accepted: Dec. 15, 2017; Published: Jan. 16, 2018
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Authors
Masta Ondara Omwono, Public Health, Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya
Justus Oseno Osero, Department of Community Health, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya
Alloys Sigar Steven Orago, Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya
Taratisio Ndwiga, Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Moi University, Eldoret, Kenya
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Abstract
Background; An estimated 51.6% of adults by age distribution among the Jaggery and Tea workers aged 18-49 years are at risk of contracting malaria due to improper use of ITNs in South Mugirango Sub County. Kisii County, Kenya. This is due to their perception and the reasons for not sleeping under ITNs. Published data on ITNs use among the Jaggery and Tea workers in South Mugirango Sub County are limited. The purpose of this study is to establish the Jaggery and Tea workers perception on ITNs use. Methods; A descriptive cross sectional study was used, where South Mugirango was purposively selected. The study systematically and randomly selected and interviewed 209 Jaggery and Tea workers on ITNs use. Qualitative methods were used to investigate their perceptions on ITNs use. Data was also collected via structured questionnaire, focused group discussion and Key informant interviews to obtain views. Results; Overall 209 Jaggery and Tea workers were selected and interviewed; 116 (56%) males and 93 (44%) females, about 52% perceived mosquitoes to cause malaria and 77.3% cited the main reasons of not using the ITNs as to cause suffocation, irritation and dreams. There was a positive relationship between gender and education on ITNs use (P<0.001,) respectively. There was also significant relationship between cost, accessibility and house structure and ITNs use (P<0.0010) while age and marital status were not statistically significant. Conclusion and recommendations; The 77.3% who perceived that ITNs causes suffocation, irritation and dreams is high number as malaria is on the rise among the study group. Therefore the study recommends; (a) Policy review on ITNs use among the Jaggery and Tea workers (b) Intensive health training on perception and beliefs on ITNs to improve its use with adoption of door to door awareness creation on the importance of ITNs use.
Keywords
Insecticide Treated Nets, Infection, Malaria, Risk
To cite this article
Masta Ondara Omwono, Justus Oseno Osero, Alloys Sigar Steven Orago, Taratisio Ndwiga, Jaggery and Tea Workers Perceptions on the Use of ITNs in Prevention of Malaria in South Mugirango Sub- County, Kisii County, Kenya, World Journal of Public Health. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2018, pp. 1-8. doi: 10.11648/j.wjph.20180301.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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