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Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage Among Patients Attending a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria
World Journal of Public Health
Volume 2, Issue 3, September 2017, Pages: 111-115
Received: Jun. 7, 2017; Accepted: Jul. 6, 2017; Published: Aug. 2, 2017
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Authors
Busari Olusegun Adesola, Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Nigeria
Gabriel Olusegun Emmanuel, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Nigeria
Agboola Segun Matthew, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Nigeria
Ajetunmobi Oluwaserimi Adewumi, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Nigeria
Adebara Idowu Oluseyi, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Nigeria
Elegbede Olayide Toyin, Department of Family Medicine, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Nigeria
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Abstract
The survey was to determine the frequency of usage of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and the factors associated with it among patients attending the general outpatient department of a tertiary care centre in Nigeria. It was carried out also in the Department of Family Medicine, Federal Teaching Hospital, Ido-Ekiti, Nigeria. It was a cross-sectional survey in which one hundred and twenty eight (128) patients were enrolled. Pre-tested questionnaire was used to collect data on demographics and other questions on knowledge and usage of CAM; satisfaction with previous usage and willingness to discuss it with their doctors. One hundred and eight (84.4%) of 128 reported that they were currently using or had used some form of CAM. Mean age of the patients was 46.8 ± 17.3 years. Fever and pains are the commonest conditions or illnesses for which CAM was used. Sixty eight (53.1%) of the patients said they were seeking treatment for the same conditions and illnesses for which they had used CAM and 46 (40%) reported that they felt CAM has helped their conditions and illnesses. CAM usage is very common among patients attending the hospital. Although only few patients learn about CAM from their doctors, majority of them think that it is important for doctors to be educated about the therapies. Doctors and other healthcare professionals need more education about CAM so that they can handle its use by their patients more effectively.
Keywords
Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Usage, Tertiary Hospital, Nigeria
To cite this article
Busari Olusegun Adesola, Gabriel Olusegun Emmanuel, Agboola Segun Matthew, Ajetunmobi Oluwaserimi Adewumi, Adebara Idowu Oluseyi, Elegbede Olayide Toyin, Complementary and Alternative Medicine Usage Among Patients Attending a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria, World Journal of Public Health. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2017, pp. 111-115. doi: 10.11648/j.wjph.20170203.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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