Infant and Young Child Feeding Practices and Associated Factors in Benishangul Gumuz Regional State, North West, Ethiopia
World Journal of Public Health
Volume 2, Issue 1, March 2017, Pages: 18-27
Received: Oct. 10, 2016; Accepted: Nov. 1, 2016; Published: Dec. 20, 2016
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Authors
Yonas Deressa Guracho, Department of Nursing, Pawe College of Health Science, Benishangul Gumuz Regional Health Bureau, Assosa, Ethiopia
Mulatu Agajie Amentie, Department of Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Assosa University, Assosa, Ethiopia
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Abstract
Introduction: In the world more than 10 million children die annually each year, in which 41% of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. In Benishangul Gumuz Regional state the infant and under-five children mortality rate were the highest among all other regional state of Ethiopia with 101 and 169 respectively. Introduction of complementary food during infancy is an important area of pediatric health supervision due to its potential effects on life-long health. Objective: assessment timely introduction of complementary feeding practice and associated factors among mothers of children age less than two years. Methods: Both quantitative and qualitative community-based cross-sectional study were conducted in seven woreda of Benishangul Gumuz Regional state on 590 infant paired mothers less than two years using simple random sampling. Data was coded, edited, entered into EPi-Info version 3.5.1 and analyzed by using SPSS version 20.0. Both descriptive and multivariable logistic regressions were used for data analysis. Results: A total of 770 women were participated with a response rate of 97.7%. The prevalence of timely introduction of complementary feeding practice was 73.9% respectively. Being Male sex [AOR=1.48(1.00-2.18)], who fulfill minimum dietary diversity [AOR=2.87(1.34-6.13)], having adequate knowledge about timely introduction complementary feeding [AOR=2.61(1.20-5.61)], were independently associated with timely introduction of complementary feeding practice. Conclusion: Although the study revealed that majority of the mothers practice timely introduction of complementary feeding but some mothers started complementary feeding before 6 month. Optimized efforts for implementing the full IYCF especially on timely introduction of complementary feeding packages will be done through the front line workers. Factors associated with early initiation of complementary food should be taken into account while designing intervention strategies and in promotion of strong community based networks using Health Extension Workers key actors.
Keywords
Timely Introduction of Complementary Feeding, Infant and Young Child Feeding, Mothers, Ethiopia
To cite this article
Yonas Deressa Guracho, Mulatu Agajie Amentie, Infant and Young Child Feeding Practices and Associated Factors in Benishangul Gumuz Regional State, North West, Ethiopia, World Journal of Public Health. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2017, pp. 18-27. doi: 10.11648/j.wjph.20170201.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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