Perception of the Impact of Certain Health Conditions on Driving Performance
World Journal of Public Health
Volume 2, Issue 1, March 2017, Pages: 1-7
Received: Oct. 27, 2016; Accepted: Nov. 5, 2016; Published: Dec. 5, 2016
Views 2378      Downloads 53
Authors
Francisco Alonso, DATS (Development and Advising in Traffic Safety) Research Group, INTRAS (University Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety), University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Cristina Esteban, DATS (Development and Advising in Traffic Safety) Research Group, INTRAS (University Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety), University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Sergio A. Useche, DATS (Development and Advising in Traffic Safety) Research Group, INTRAS (University Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety), University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Andrea Serge, DATS (Development and Advising in Traffic Safety) Research Group, INTRAS (University Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety), University of Valencia, Valencia, Spain
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Driving task requires the joint performance of many abilities which can be altered by several psychophysical conditions. Furthermore, a large number of recent studies on driving has found that there are several conditions that may affect the ability to operate safely motor vehicles and to prevent road crashes. The objective of this study was to describe the perception of drivers about the effect of certain health conditions on driving performance. This cross-sectional study used a total sample of n =1200 (666 [56%] men and 534 [44%] women) Spanish drivers, who answered a questionnaire designed to collect data about their psychosocial characteristics, driving habits and perceptions about the driving task. One-way ANOVA and Bonferroni's Post-hoc tests were performed to compare data among groups of drivers. Results showed that that drivers consider that the influence of alcohol, drugs, drowsiness and medicine consumption may impair their driving, but do not take into account certain health conditions that may be common among the population of drivers, such as diabetes, allergies, joint pains, myopia, heart or post-heart-attack problems, as well as headaches and migraines, as risk-related, regarding its potential negative impact on driving performance. In short, there is a substantial lack of correspondence between driver's perceptions and behaviors with respect to the impact of health conditions on crash risk, and a growing need to raise people’s awareness regarding certain health conditions that may impair driving through road safety formation and media campaigns. Furthermore, taking into account the frequency of the health conditions analyzed and their high impact on driving, this research suggests implementing systems that fulfill two basic requirements: to improve the flow of preventive information for drivers, and strengthen the control and monitoring of their health through a joint action of the health care system and the traffic system.
Keywords
Health State, Health Conditions, Driving Impairing, Driving Performance, Traffic Accidents, Road Safety
To cite this article
Francisco Alonso, Cristina Esteban, Sergio A. Useche, Andrea Serge, Perception of the Impact of Certain Health Conditions on Driving Performance, World Journal of Public Health. Vol. 2, No. 1, 2017, pp. 1-7. doi: 10.11648/j.wjph.20170201.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
References
[1]
R. Subramanian, “Motor Vehicle Traffic Crashes as a Leading Cause of Death in the United States, 2008 and 2009”. National Highway Traffic Safety. Institute (NHTSA). Washington D. C., 2012.
[2]
E. Vingilis, P. Wilk, “Medical conditions, medication use, and their relationship with subsequent motor vehicle injuries: examination of the Canadian national population health survey”. Traffic Injury Prevention, 2012, 13, 327-336. doi: 10.1080/15389588.2012.654411.
[3]
L. Hill, J. Rybar, S. Baird, S. Concha-Garcia, R. Coimbra, K. Patrick, “Road safe seniors: Screening for age-related driving disorders in inpatient and outpatient settings”. Journal of Safety Research, 2011, 42(3), 165-169. doi: 10.1016/j.jsr.2011.05.005.
[4]
WHO, “Global status report on Road Safety: Time for Action”. World Health Organization. Geneva 2009.
[5]
WHO, “Global status report on road safety 2013: supporting a decade of action”. World Health Organization. Geneva, 2014.
[6]
B. Cendales-Ayala, S. A. Useche, V. Gómez-Ortiz, “Psychosocial Work Factors, Blood Pressure and Psychological Strain in Male Bus Operators”. Industrial Health, 2014, 52, pp. 279–288.
[7]
VicRoads (2013). VicRoads Medical Review. Available at the website: www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/Home/Licences/Medicalreview/MedicalReview.htm (accessed 08.10.16).
[8]
B. Cendales-Ayala, S. A. Useche, V. Gómez-Ortiz and J. P. Bocarejo, “Bus Operators' Responses to Job Strain: An Experimental Test of the Job Demand-Control Model”. Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 2016.
[9]
F. Alonso, C. Esteban, C. Calatayud, B. Alamar, A. Egido, “Salud vial. Teoría y prácticas de los trastornos físicos y psíquicos en la conducción”. University Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety (INTRAS). Valencia, 2008.
[10]
F. Alonso, J. Sanmartín, C. Esteban, C. Calatayud, B. Alamar, E. López, “Salud Vial. Diagnóstico de los conductores españoles”. University Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety (INTRAS). Valencia, 2008.
[11]
F. Alonso, C. Esteban, C. Calatayud, B. Alamar, C. Fernández, J. E. Medina, “Salud vial: ¿El conductor a terapia?”. University Research Institute on Traffic and Road Safety (INTRAS). Valencia, 2008.
[12]
C. Albright, M. Ingleby, D. Ragland, J. Fisher, S. Leonard, “Job strain and prevalence of hypertension in a biracial population of urban bus drivers”. American Journal of Public Health, 1992, 82(7), pp. 984-989.
[13]
F. Alonso, C. Esteban, L. Montoro, F. Tortosa, “Psychotropic drugs and driving: prevalence and types”. Annals of General Psychiatry, 2014, 13(14), pp. 1-10.
[14]
R. A. Marottoli, P. H. Ness, K. L. Araujo, L. P. Iannone, D. Acampora, P. Charpentier, P. A. Peduzzi, “Randomized trial of an education program to enhance older driver performance”. The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences, 2007, 62(10), pp. 1113-1119.
[15]
A. Hetland, D. Carr, “Medications and Impaired Driving”. Annals of Pharmacotherapy, 2014, 48(4), pp. 494-506. doi: 10.1177/1060028014520882.
[16]
T. Ivers, N. Whote, “Potentially Driver-Impairing Medications: Risks and Strategies for Injury Prevention”. American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine, 2016, 10(1), pp. 17-20. doi: 10.1177/1559827615609050.
[17]
B. E. Smink, A. C. G. Egberts, K. Lusthof, D. R. A. Uges, J. J. de Gier, “The Relationship between Benzodiazepine Use and Traffic Accidents: A Systematic Literature Review”. CNS Drugs, 2010, 24(8), pp. 639-53. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.2165/11533170-000000000-00000.
[18]
R. Penning, J. L. Veldstra, A. P. Daamen, B. Olivier, J. C. Verster, “Drugs of abuse, driving and traffic safety”. Current Drug Abuse Reviews, 2010, 3(1), pp. 23-32.
[19]
K. A. Sargent-Cox, T. Windsor, J. Walker, K. J. Anstey, “Health literacy of older drivers and the importance of health experience for self-regulation of driving behavior”. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 2011, 43(3), pp. 898-905. doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2010.11.012.
[20]
G. C. Gee, D. T. Takeuchi, “Traffic stress, vehicular burden and well-being: A multilevel analysis”. Social Science & Medicine, 2004, 59(2), pp. 405-414. doi: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2003.10.027
[21]
H. H. Mitchell “Medical Problems and Physical Fitness as Related to Occurrence of Traffic Accidents”. National highway Safety Bureau. Department of Transportation. Santa Monica, 1966.
[22]
D. A. Redelmeier, B. A. McLellan, “Modern Medicine Is Neglecting Road Traffic Crashes”. PLoS Med, 2013, 10(6), e1001463. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001463.
[23]
S. A. Useche, A. Serge, F. Alonso, “Risky Behaviors and Stress Indicators between Novice and Experienced Drivers”. American Journal of Applied Psychology, 2015, 3(1), pp. 11-14. doi: 10.12691/ajap-3-1-3.
[24]
INRETS, “European drivers and road risk. Part 1: Report on principal results”. Institut national de recherche sur les transports et leur sécurité. Paris, 2004.
[25]
INRETS, “European drivers and road risk. Part 2: Report on in-depth analyses”. Institut national de recherche sur les transports et leur sécurité. Paris, 2004.
[26]
F. J. Álvarez, M. C. del Río, “Alcohol and road accidents: What to prevent?” Trastornos adictivos, 2001, 3(3), pp. 172-180.
[27]
W. Ray, R. Fought, M. Decker, “Psychoactive Drugs and the Risk of Injurious Motor Vehicle Crashes in Elderly Drivers”. American Journal of Epidemiology, 1992, 136 (7): pp. 873-883. doi: 10.1093/aje/136.7.873.
[28]
D. Léger, C. Guilleminault, G. Bader, E. Lévy, M. Paillard, “Medical and socio-professional impact of insomnia”. Sleep, 2002, 25(6), pp. 621-625. PMID: 12224841.
[29]
R. Owen Phillips, P. Ulleberg, T. Vaa, “Meta-analysis of the effect of road safety campaigns on accidents”, Accident Analysis and Prevention, 2011, 43(3), pp. 1204-1218. doi: 10.1016/j.aap.2011.01.002.
[30]
R. R. Knipling, J. S. Hickman, G. Bergofen, “Effective Commercial Truck and Bus Safety Manegement Techniques”. Transportation Research Board. Washington D. C., 2003.
[31]
V. Hobi, “Psychopharmaca, Psychic Illness, and Driving Ability: A Contribution to the Debate”. Journal of International Medical Research, 1982, 10(5), pp. 283-305. doi: 10.1177/030006058201000501.
[32]
M. Hitosugi, S, Gomeu, T. Okubo, S. Tokudome, “Sudden illness while driving a vehicle: A retrospective analysis of commercial drivers in Japan”. Scandinavian Journal of Work Environment & Health, 2012, 38(1), pp. 84–87. doi: 10.5271/sjweh.3189.
[33]
V. Cowart, P. Kandela, “Prescription drugs and driving performance”. JAMA, 1985, 254(1), pp. 15-27. doi: 10.1001/jama.1985.03360010017003.
[34]
A. Oyarzabal, F. Ceberio, F. Ballero, V. Sangüesa, S. Martinez, “Psicotrópicos y dolor durante la conducción”. Atención primaria, 2014, 46(2), pp. 111-112. doi: 10.1016/j.aprim.2013.06.002.
[35]
C. Selwyn, “Age, Health, and Driving Ability: Perceptions of Older Adults”. Thesis. Georgia State University, Atlanta, 2014.
[36]
M. Ozcoidi Val, “Consideraciones históricas de las normativas sobre el consumo de alcohol, drogas y medicamentos en el modelo español de valoración psicofísica de los conductors”. Trastornos adictivos, 2005, 7(2), pp. 97-103. doi: 10.1016/S1575-0973(05)74514-1.
[37]
R. W. Elder, R. A. Shults, D. A. Sleet, J. L. Nichols, R. S. Thompson, W. Rajab, “Effectiveness of mass media campaigns for reducing drinking and driving and alcohol-involved crashes: A systematic review”. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2004, 27(1), pp. 57-65. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2004.03.002.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186