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Awareness and Attitude of Nurses on the Use of Maggot Therapy in the Treatment of Diabetic Ulcers at the Bamenda Regional Hospital, Cameroon
World Journal of Public Health
Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2016, Pages: 6-9
Received: Oct. 10, 2016; Accepted: Oct. 15, 2016; Published: Nov. 10, 2016
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Authors
Samuel Nambile Cumber, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; Under Privileged Children and Women Assistance (UPCAWA-SWEDEN), Bamenda City, Cameroon
Kuhvinyoh Boris Limnyuy, Under Privileged Children and Women Assistance (UPCAWA-SWEDEN), Bamenda City, Cameroon; State Registered Nursing School, Bamenda, Cameroon
Jackson Jr. Nforbewing Ndenkeh, State Registered Nursing School, Bamenda, Cameroon; Department of Biomedical Sciences, University of Dschang, Dschang, Cameroon
Shalom Jaila, Under Privileged Children and Women Assistance (UPCAWA-SWEDEN), Bamenda City, Cameroon; State Registered Nursing School, Bamenda, Cameroon
Nancy Bongkiynuy, Under Privileged Children and Women Assistance (UPCAWA-SWEDEN), Bamenda City, Cameroon; State Registered Nursing School, Bamenda, Cameroon
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Abstract
Maggot therapy (MT) is a type of therapy in which live, disinfected maggots cultured in a sterile manner is placed into a non-healing skin and soft tissue wound of humans to clean out the necrotic tissue within a wound and to disinfect it. This therapy has been used for centuries for treatment of non-healing soft tissue wounds until the arrival of antibiotics and modern surgical techniques, by the beginning of the 40’s, MT when it was quickly substituted and forgotten. The purpose of this study was to determine the nurses’ awareness and attitude on the use of maggot therapy in the treatment of diabetic ulcers in Bamenda Regional Hospital. A hospital based descriptive study design was used in which 43 nurses were randomly selected with inclusion criteria being nurses at the diabetic unit and data collected using questionnaires. From the results obtained, 46.7% of nurses were aware of maggot therapy and their attitude towards MT was both positive and negative at almost equal levels. The main source of awareness here was the internet on the use of MT in treating diabetic ulcers. With the increasing burden of high blood pressure and diabetes in Africa there is the need use all the available tools in the treatment of the complications these patients can face; use of maggots inclusive which is cheaper especially in the resource limited context of Cameroon. With the divided awareness and attitude towards the use of maggots in the treatment of diabetic ulcers in this health facility, there is thus the need to increase awareness amongst the nurses on its importance in the treatment of diabetic ulcers.
Keywords
Awareness, Maggot Therapy, Diabetic Ulcers, Cameroon
To cite this article
Samuel Nambile Cumber, Kuhvinyoh Boris Limnyuy, Jackson Jr. Nforbewing Ndenkeh, Shalom Jaila, Nancy Bongkiynuy, Awareness and Attitude of Nurses on the Use of Maggot Therapy in the Treatment of Diabetic Ulcers at the Bamenda Regional Hospital, Cameroon, World Journal of Public Health. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2016, pp. 6-9. doi: 10.11648/j.wjph.20160101.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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