Epidemiological Study of HCV and HIV Infections in Relation to Certain Demographic Factors Among the Ante-Natal Population Within Kaduna Metropolis, Nigeria
International Journal of Infectious Diseases and Therapy
Volume 1, Issue 1, December 2016, Pages: 13-21
Received: Oct. 31, 2016; Accepted: Nov. 18, 2016; Published: Dec. 27, 2016
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Authors
Chanu Iliyasu, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
Auwalu Uba, Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science and Science Education, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, Bauchi, Nigeria
Muhammad Yusha’u, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Bayero University, Kano, Nigeria
Anthony John Dadah, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
Timothy Waje, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Science, Kaduna State University, Kaduna, Nigeria
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Abstract
Hepatitis C and HIV are blood borne infections of the human population including pregnant women globally. These Viruses are of global concern because of the significant challenges they pose to public health with over 36.7 million people leaving with HIV around the whole world. This research determined the prevalence of HCV, HIV and HCV-HIV co infection among pregnant women attending ante-natal in selected hospitals within the Kaduna metropolis. A total of 500 samples were collected from pregnant women on ante-natal in 5 different hospitals within the metropolis. One hundred samples were collected from each of the hospitals visited. Each sample was analyzed for HCV and HIV antibodies respectively using commercially available kits. Results analysis revealed prevalence rates of 1.4% for HCV, 5.80% for HIV and 0.40% HCV-HIV co-infection among the subjects. Chi square statistics for test of independence between 2 variables showed significant associations between HCV positivity and history of more than 2 sexual partners (p≤0.01), Age group between 36-40 years (p≤0.02), Unknown gestational age and 4-6 months respectively (p≤0.0002, p≤0.03). These were identified as potential risks for HCV contraction. On the other hand, there was no significant association between any of the demographic factors and HIV positivity which showed that exposure to the HIV causes infection regardless of any demographic factor. There is low prevalence of HCV, high prevalence of HIV and low prevalence of HCV-HIV co-infection among the ante-natal population within the metropolis.
Keywords
Epidemiology, HIV, HCV, Demographic Factors, Pregnant Women, Kaduna
To cite this article
Chanu Iliyasu, Auwalu Uba, Muhammad Yusha’u, Anthony John Dadah, Timothy Waje, Epidemiological Study of HCV and HIV Infections in Relation to Certain Demographic Factors Among the Ante-Natal Population Within Kaduna Metropolis, Nigeria, International Journal of Infectious Diseases and Therapy. Vol. 1, No. 1, 2016, pp. 13-21. doi: 10.11648/j.ijidt.20160101.13
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Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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