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Neck Circumference as an Independent Cardiometabolic Risk Factor: A Cross-sectional Study in Kinshasa
International Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology
Volume 5, Issue 2, June 2020, Pages: 27-33
Received: Jun. 24, 2020; Accepted: Jul. 16, 2020; Published: Aug. 13, 2020
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Authors
Danny Mafuta-Munganga, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
Benjamin Longo-Mbenza, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; Department of Public Health, Lomo University of Research, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; Department of Environments, Faculty of Health Sciences, Walter Sisulu University, Mthatha, South Africa
Gedeon Longo-Longo, Department of Public Health, Lomo University of Research, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
Manzala, Department of Public Health, Lomo University of Research, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
Victor Nzuzi, Department of Public Health, Lomo University of Research, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
Jean Bosco Kasiam Lasi On’kin, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
Etienne Mokondjimobe, Department of Public Health, Lomo University of Research, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo; Department of Environments, Faculty of Health Sciences, Marien Ngouabi University, Brazzaville, Republic of Congo
Aliocha Nkondila Natuhoyila, Department of Public Health, Lomo University of Research, Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo
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Abstract
Objective: To investigate the association between neck circumference (NC) and traditional cardiometabolic risk factors (CMRF) among adult’s population at Kinshasa. Methods: A total of 400 participants were recruited. Spearman’s correlation coefficient was employed to test the correlations between NC and CMRF. The association of NC with CMRF (dependent variables) was assessed by logistic regression. The receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis had allowed determining the cut-off points of NC to detect the presence of CMRF. Results: The average of age and WC was 55.4±12.0 years and 79.8±12.0 cm, respectively. The median value of BMI was significantly higher in women (24.6 kg/m2) than in men (22.6 kg/m2); whereas the median value of NC was significantly higher in men (37.8 cm) than in women (33.3 cm) (p < 0.001). In both men and women, NC was positively correlated with TC, LDL, TG and WC. Additionally, FPG and HDL were positively correlated with NC significantly. Moreover, there was a significant positive correlation between NECK and FPG but a significant negative correlation between NECK and HDLc among women. TG in men, raised TC, LDL and WC were found to be significantly associated with neck circumference with ORs 1.25 (95% CI: 1.08, 1.44), 0.67 (95% CI: 0.53, 0.85), 1.13 (95% CI: 1.02, 1.26), 1.27 (95% CI: 1.12, 1.45) in men versus 1.18 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.36) in women, 1.19 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.34) in men versus 1.21 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.38) in women and 1.18 (95% CI: 1.06, 1.36) in men versus 1.43 (95% CI: 1.23, 1.66) in women, respectively. Cut-off points for NC to identify CMRF were between 37.5 and 38 cm in men, 32.5 and 33 cm in women. Conclusion: NC is associated with CMRF, and could be a useful and accurate tool to identify high risk participants.
Keywords
Neck Circumference, Cardiometabolic Risk, Kinshasa
To cite this article
Danny Mafuta-Munganga, Benjamin Longo-Mbenza, Gedeon Longo-Longo, Manzala, Victor Nzuzi, Jean Bosco Kasiam Lasi On’kin, Etienne Mokondjimobe, Aliocha Nkondila Natuhoyila, Neck Circumference as an Independent Cardiometabolic Risk Factor: A Cross-sectional Study in Kinshasa, International Journal of Diabetes and Endocrinology. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2020, pp. 27-33. doi: 10.11648/j.ijde.20200502.13
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Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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