Description of the Histological Features in Wounds of Snake Bite Aetiology
Advances in Surgical Sciences
Volume 5, Issue 4, August 2017, Pages: 57-60
Received: Feb. 21, 2017; Accepted: May 6, 2017; Published: Aug. 3, 2017
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Authors
Dissanayakalage Ajith Dissanayake, Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka; District General Hospital, Gampaha, Sri Lanka
Cherine Susanthy Priyadharshini Sosai, Department of Pathology, District General Hospital, Gampaha, Sri Lanka
Mawathagama Gedara Lional Weerawardane, District General Hospital, Gampaha, Sri Lanka
Jayavickrama Withanage Sriya Priyadharshanie, District General Hospital, Gampaha, Sri Lanka
Rajapakse Peramune Vedikkarage Jayanthe Rajapakse, Department of Veterinary Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Science, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
Senanayake Abeysinghe Mudiyanselage Kularatne, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka
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Abstract
The chronic wounds that develop following snake bites may display a spectrum of histological features that could be correlated with the type of venom injected. The pathological changes may provide useful information for the management of chronic wounds that develop following snake bites. This study intends to assess the histopathological changes seen in chronic wounds following Daboia russelii (Russell’s viper), Hypnale species (Hump nosed viper) and Naja naja (Cobra) bites and wounds of non snake bite aetiology. Inflammatory cells were seen in snake bite and non snake bite wounds. An intense mixed cellular inflammatory cell presence around the vessels could be seen. More lymphocytes and plasma cells were seen in wounds following snake bite and presence of more eosinophils was detected in wounds with other aetiology. Haemorrhagic areas in the dermis were seen in tissue samples taken from Naja naja and Hypnale species bite wounds. Vascular proliferation was predominant in all chronic wounds following snake bite. Granulation tissues were also more in chronic wounds following snake bites than the wounds of other aetiology. Among these three snake bites, haemorrhage was present mainly in Naja naja and Hypnale bite wounds compared to Daboia russelii.
Keywords
Histopathology, Chronic Wound, Russell’s Viper, Hump Nosed Viper, Cobra, Aetiology
To cite this article
Dissanayakalage Ajith Dissanayake, Cherine Susanthy Priyadharshini Sosai, Mawathagama Gedara Lional Weerawardane, Jayavickrama Withanage Sriya Priyadharshanie, Rajapakse Peramune Vedikkarage Jayanthe Rajapakse, Senanayake Abeysinghe Mudiyanselage Kularatne, Description of the Histological Features in Wounds of Snake Bite Aetiology, Advances in Surgical Sciences. Vol. 5, No. 4, 2017, pp. 57-60. doi: 10.11648/j.ass.20170504.15
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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