Availability, Coverage and Geographical Distribution of Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care Services in Tanzania Mainland
Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Volume 5, Issue 1, January 2017, Pages: 1-8
Received: Oct. 4, 2016; Accepted: Jan. 19, 2017; Published: Feb. 15, 2017
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Authors
Projestine Muganyizi, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Edward Maswanya, National Institute for Medical Research, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Stella Kilima, National Institute for Medical Research, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Grades Stanley, National Institute for Medical Research, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Ahmad Makuwani, Ministry of Health Community Development Gender Elderly and Children, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Julius Massaga, Ministry of Health Community Development Gender Elderly and Children, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Victor Bakengesa, Ministry of Health Community Development Gender Elderly and Children, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
Georgina Msemo, Ministry of Health Community Development Gender Elderly and Children, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
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Abstract
In order to assess the availability of Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EmONC) services in Tanzania Mainland, a Cross-sectional survey of a National sample of obstetric care facilities was conducted in 2015. We adapted the Averting Maternal Deaths and Disabilities (AMDD) tool and did spatial mapping using a calibrated Global Positioning System (GPS) Essential Software for Android and Arc Geographical Information System (GIS) software. Data were analysed using STATA, SPSS and Excel computer programs. Ethical approval was granted by the National Institute for Medical Research and the Ministry of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children. We identified 5207 obstetric care facilities which is equivalent to 59.7 facilities per 500,000 population. We surveyed 2405 (46.2%) facilities of which 251 (10.4%) had provided all the 7 Basic Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care (BEmONC) in past 3 months. Among these, 130 had provided Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care (CEmONC). The UN benchmarks for BEmONC and CEmONC facility densities were attained or exceeded by 40% and 76% in all 25 regions respectively. EmONC facilities were dominated by hospitals and were clustered in cities and townships. In conclusions, the distribution of EmONC facilities in Tanzania Mainland is suboptimal in more than half of regions with clustering around cities and townships.
Keywords
Emergency Obstetric Care, Emergency Neonatal Care, Geographical Distribution, Health Services Availability, Tanzania
To cite this article
Projestine Muganyizi, Edward Maswanya, Stella Kilima, Grades Stanley, Ahmad Makuwani, Julius Massaga, Victor Bakengesa, Georgina Msemo, Availability, Coverage and Geographical Distribution of Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care Services in Tanzania Mainland, Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Vol. 5, No. 1, 2017, pp. 1-8. doi: 10.11648/j.jgo.20170501.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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