Protective Effect of Cocoa Extract on Malondialdehyde Level in Ultraviolet B Induced - Albino Mice Skin
American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Volume 5, Issue 2, March 2017, Pages: 41-45
Received: Jan. 27, 2017; Accepted: Feb. 10, 2017; Published: Mar. 1, 2017
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Authors
Suci Nugraeni Tahir, Departement Dermatology and Venereal, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia
Farida Tabri, Departement Dermatology and Venereal, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia
Khairuddin Djawad, Departement Dermatology and Venereal, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia
Anni Adriani, Departement Dermatology and Venereal, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia
Arifin Seweng, Departement of Biostatistic, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia
Nasrum Massi, Departement of Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Hasanuddin, Makassar, Indonesia
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Abstract
The antioxidant activity in cocoa linked to the polyphenol content therein, especially subunit monomers catechin and epicatechin. The aim of the study was to determine the protective effects of cocoa extract on levels of malondialdehyde in albino mice by exposure to UVB. This study was conducted at animal laboratory to interventions UVB and Extract, Cocoa and Biomolecular laboratory of medical faculty of Hasanuddin University for the ELISA examination. This study used true experimental design with animal experimental design to assess the effectiveness of topical application cacao extract on mice skin after UVB induction for twelve weeks. The research samples were 30 head of albino mice divided into 6 groups: control 5 mice without protection and given 450 mJ UV Bexposure 3 times per week, the second group was 5 untreated controlmice, the third group was 5 mice with 100 ppm of cocoa topical extract every day and UVB 450 mJ exposure 3 times a week, the fourth group of 5 mice with 200 ppm topical cocoa extract every day and exposure to 450 mJ three times a week, the fifth group of 5 mice with 400 ppm topical cocoa extract every day and exposure to 450 mJ three times a week, the sixth group of 5 mice with 800 ppm topical everyday cocoa extract and exposure to 450 mJ three times a week, a week after termination and biopsy excisionof skin for examination of Malondialdehyde level with ELISA. The results indicated resources of 200 ppm cocoa extract Provides the best effect with reduced MDA levels with the highest protective effect Compared to other groups.
Keywords
Cocoa Extract, Malondialdehyde, Ultraviolet B
To cite this article
Suci Nugraeni Tahir, Farida Tabri, Khairuddin Djawad, Anni Adriani, Arifin Seweng, Nasrum Massi, Protective Effect of Cocoa Extract on Malondialdehyde Level in Ultraviolet B Induced - Albino Mice Skin, American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2017, pp. 41-45. doi: 10.11648/j.ajcem.20170502.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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