The Level of Copper in Hair Androgenic Alopecia
American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Volume 4, Issue 4, July 2016, Pages: 98-102
Received: May 20, 2016; Accepted: May 31, 2016; Published: Jun. 17, 2016
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Authors
Wiwiek Amriyana Saputri, Department of Dermatovenereology, Medical Faculty, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
Farida Tabri, Department of Dermatovenereology, Medical Faculty, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
Nurelly Noro Waspodo, Department of Dermatovenereology, Medical Faculty, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
Burhanuddin Bahar, Biostatistic, Medical Faculty, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
Agussalim Bukhari, Department of Clinical Nutritional, Medical Faculty, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
Nursiah La Nafie, Department of Chemical, Mathematics and Sciences Faculty, Hasanuddin University, Makassar, Indonesia
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Abstract
Androgenic alopecia is characterized by progressive loss of hair from the scalp. This research aimed to determine the hair and blood copper levels in men with androgenic alopecia. The research was conducted in the Department of Dermatovenereology of Dr. Wahidin Sudirohusodo Hospital, Makassar and the Center for Health Laboratory, Makassar, using the observational research method. The samples comprised 21 the males with androgenic alopecia and 11 control samples without androgenic alopecia. The hair and blood of the samples were analyzed using the atomic absorption spectrophotometer receipts. The research results indicated resources that the hair copper level in the androgenic alopecia group Showed a difference compared to the hair copper levels in the control group, though the difference was significant (p <0.05). On the other hand, the blood copper levels in androgenic alopecia group had no difference compared to that in the control group. The hair copper levels had no correlation with the blood copper levels. The age had a significant correlation with the androgenic alopecia, in that, the alopecia incidence would increase of as the age increased (p <0.05). However, the levels of both the hair and blood coppers had no correlation with the age. Neither, did the levels of both copper hair and blood have a correlation with the degree of androgenic alopecia (Hamilton grade).
Keywords
Androgenic Alopecia, Copper, Hair Loss
To cite this article
Wiwiek Amriyana Saputri, Farida Tabri, Nurelly Noro Waspodo, Burhanuddin Bahar, Agussalim Bukhari, Nursiah La Nafie, The Level of Copper in Hair Androgenic Alopecia, American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Vol. 4, No. 4, 2016, pp. 98-102. doi: 10.11648/j.ajcem.20160404.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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