Iatrogenic Invasion of Maxillary Sinus in Oral Surgery
American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Pages: 383-385
Received: Dec. 30, 2015; Published: Dec. 30, 2015
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Authors
Antonio Crispino, Department of Dentistry, University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, Catanzaro, Italy
Leonzio Fortunato, Department of Dentistry, University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, Catanzaro, Italy
Luigi Lidonnici, Department of Dentistry, University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, Catanzaro, Italy
Roberto Del Giudice, Department of Dentistry, University of Catanzaro “Magna Graecia”, Catanzaro, Italy
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Abstract
Iatrogenic diseases affecting the maxillary sinus may be consequent to both technical errors operator both represent something "inevitable", linked to the particular situation of anatomical contiguity between pathologic finding to be removed and the sinus. They can result from multiple occurrences: Extraction of dental elements erupted of the posterior maxilla, most frequently in the case of multi-rooted elements with roots long and diverse; Surgical extraction of impacted teeth, especially the third molars, second premolars and, more rarely, canines; Dislocation in the roots of the maxillary sinus, dental elements or parts of fractured instruments (in this case the event is always tied to a technical error); Enucleation of periapical lesions or cysts whose walls are adherent to the sinus mucosa; Removal of benign growths such as odontomas or other odontogenic tumors and odontogenic not directly related to the sinus mucosa; Preparation of implant sites in the posterior maxilla, due to incorrect assessment of the space available between the alveolar margin and sinus floor. Meta-analytical, observational and retrospective study obtained from a literature review of 10 articles. Its primary etiological factor is dental extraction and preparation of dental implant sites. The lesions iatrogenic sinus occurred during oral surgery or implant surgery can be provided and certainly reduced. The way forward is that of a careful planning designed to reduce the risk of accidents during surgery.
Keywords
Maxillary Sinus, Oral Surgery, Dental Implant
To cite this article
Antonio Crispino, Leonzio Fortunato, Luigi Lidonnici, Roberto Del Giudice, Iatrogenic Invasion of Maxillary Sinus in Oral Surgery, American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 383-385. doi: 10.11648/j.ajcem.20150306.21
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