Relationship Between Severity Levels of Diseases in Children with Maternal Anxiety at Pediatric Intensive Care Unit
American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine
Volume 3, Issue 3, May 2015, Pages: 94-98
Received: Apr. 7, 2015; Accepted: Apr. 16, 2015; Published: Apr. 24, 2015
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Authors
Imelda , Department of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty of Hasanuddin University, Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia
Martira Maddeppungeng, Department of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty of Hasanuddin University, Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia
Idham Jaya Ganda, Department of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty of Hasanuddin University, Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia
Dasril Daud, Department of Pediatrics, Medical Faculty of Hasanuddin University, Makassar, South Sulawesi, Indonesia
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Abstract
Background: PICU (pediatric intensive care unit) is child care units that require intensive surveillance and invasive action. A state of anxious disorder is characterized by feelings of fear which accompanied by somatic complaints shown with hyperactivities of autonomic nervous system and non-specific symptom and normal emotion. Objective: This study identified the factors associated with the occurrence of anxiety in mothers whose child was treated in a PICU suffered degrees of severity of disease. Methods: A cross-sectional studies have been conducted since April to September 2014 at Dr .Wahidin Sudirohusodo Hospital, Makassar. Samples were children aged 1 month to 18 years old who experienced the severity of the disease based on the PRISM III scores treated at PICU. Results: Of the 151 samples of children, there were 88 male and 63 female. Bivariate analyzes mothers who have children with PRISM III score ≥15 had a greater occurrence frequency of severe anxiety disorders compared with mothers whose children have PRISM III score <15, with a value of p= 0.000 (p<0.01). There is a correlation between the PRISM III scores in children with maternal HARS scores, which is a higher PRISM III score will also make the HARS scores higher with p<0.001, correlation value of 0.296. Conclusion: There is a correlation between PRISM III score in children and the score of HARS in the mother, which is the highest of PRISM III score, the HARS score will also be higher.
Keywords
PICU (Pediatric Intensive Care Unit), PRISM (Pediatric Risk of Mortality) III Score, HARS (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale) Score, Children
To cite this article
Imelda , Martira Maddeppungeng, Idham Jaya Ganda, Dasril Daud, Relationship Between Severity Levels of Diseases in Children with Maternal Anxiety at Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, American Journal of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2015, pp. 94-98. doi: 10.11648/j.ajcem.20150303.14
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