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Antioxidant Vitamins A and E in Relation to BMI in Steady State Sickle Cell Anaemia and Normal Controls in North Eastern Nigeria
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 5, September 2017, Pages: 388-391
Received: Apr. 28, 2017; Accepted: Jul. 17, 2017; Published: Aug. 14, 2017
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Authors
Tukur Maisaratu Aminu, Department of Human Physiology, College of Medical Sciences, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria
Salami Hamza Adegoke, Department of Human Physiology, College of Medical Sciences, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria
Ibrahim Bilal Muhammad, Department of Human Physiology, College of Medical Sciences, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria
Abubakar Abdulwasi’u, Department of Human Physiology, College of Medical Sciences, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria
Shehu Binta Baba, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria
Ambe Jose Pwavimbo, Department of Paediatrics, College of Medical Sciences, University of Maiduguri, Maiduguri, Nigeria
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Abstract
Sickle cell anaemia is one of the commonest causes of anaemia in sub-Saharan Africa. It causes significant morbidity and mortality, commoner in black Africa, but due to increase medical care, the life expectancy is on increase. Several studies have been carried out on sickle cell anaemia (SCA) nationally and internationally. This present study determined the BMI of SCA patients in the steady state compared to normal control in the north-eastern Nigeria. A cross-sectional study was carried out at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital (UMTH) as a referral center. Undergraduate students, secondary and primary school students of the University of Maiduguri Borno state were incorporated in the study as controls. A total number of 120 subjects were enrolled into the study constituting 60 subjects with homozygous SS, and 60 controls who are homozygous AA. Random sampling technique was employed in the selection of the subjects that attends the sickle cell haematology clinics both in adults and paediatrics that were at their steady state. BMI of the SCA were found to be either normal weight (18.5-24.9kg/m2) or underweight (<18.5kg/m2), while the subject with normal haemoglobin genotype showed overweight (25-29.9kg/m2) and obese (>29.9kg/m2) in addition to underweight and normal weight. Antioxidant vitamins A and E were also found to be low in SCA patients compared to the normal controls In conclusion, we therefore concluded that overweight and obese is very rare in patients with sickle cell anaemia.
Keywords
Vitamin A, Vitamin E, Basal Metabolic Index, Sickle Cell Anaemia
To cite this article
Tukur Maisaratu Aminu, Salami Hamza Adegoke, Ibrahim Bilal Muhammad, Abubakar Abdulwasi’u, Shehu Binta Baba, Ambe Jose Pwavimbo, Antioxidant Vitamins A and E in Relation to BMI in Steady State Sickle Cell Anaemia and Normal Controls in North Eastern Nigeria, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp. 388-391. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20170505.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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