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Telemedicine Diffusion in a Developing Country: A Case of Ghana
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 5, Issue 5, September 2017, Pages: 383-387
Received: Oct. 20, 2016; Accepted: Nov. 19, 2016; Published: Aug. 8, 2017
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Authors
Femi Ekanoye, International Center for Information Technology and Development, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Foluso Ayeni, International Center for Information Technology and Development, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Temitope Olokunde, International Center for Information Technology and Development, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Carole Mireille Mende, International Center for Information Technology and Development, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Vekima Nina, International Center for Information Technology and Development, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
Victor Mbarika, International Center for Information Technology and Development, Southern University and A & M College, Baton Rouge, USA
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Abstract
Telemedicine allows healthcare professionals to evaluate, diagnose, and treat patients. International telemedicine is detrimental and necessary in order to exchange information through electronic communications to improve and assist in patient healthcare. In this study we examine and assess the telemedicine practice in the developing country of Ghana. Healthcare coverage is an expensive worldwide epidemic and population growth in developing nations continues to remain high. This requires support from national leaders and the citizens who comprise the societies. The slums of Accra, the capital of Ghana are inhabited by low-income earners and migrants. Citizens are unlikely to insure as they move closer to poverty regardless of the risk-aversions they may face regarding illness. Limited benefits of being insured and failure to uphold promised benefits will also negatively affect the Ghana citizens to remain insured as they move to a fight or flight mindset for survival. With support from government leaders, Telemedicine can influence Ghana in a very positive way. With financial support as well as technological support the Health epidemic in Africa can be reduced and better manageable.
Keywords
Telemedicine, Ghana, Healthcare Coverage, Health Epidemic, Africa
To cite this article
Femi Ekanoye, Foluso Ayeni, Temitope Olokunde, Carole Mireille Mende, Vekima Nina, Victor Mbarika, Telemedicine Diffusion in a Developing Country: A Case of Ghana, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 5, No. 5, 2017, pp. 383-387. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20170505.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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