A Study on the Nutritional Status of Preschool Children in Three Districts of Bangladesh
Science Journal of Public Health
Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2015, Pages: 633-637
Received: May 27, 2015; Accepted: Jun. 15, 2015; Published: Jul. 3, 2015
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Authors
Md. Tanvir Sarwar, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Mst Amina Sultana, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Shammy Akter, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Md. Sidur Rahman, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Shakh M. A. Rouf, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
Md. Salim Raza, Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia, Bangladesh
M. Sabir Hossain, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Jahangirnagar University, Savar Dhaka, Bangladesh
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Abstract
Malnutrition is the main nutritional problem in the developing countries like Bangladesh. The most vulnerable groups are under-5 children, adolescent girls, pregnant and lactating mothers. This study investigated the nutritional status of children aged 2-5 years of urban and rural areas of three different districts (Kushtia, Jhenidah and Jessore) of Bangladesh. The study was conducted on 200 children among those 100 were from Kushtia, 50 from Jhenidah and 50 from Jessore district. Among the children of Kushtia 55 were male & 45 were female. Among the children of Jhenidah 27 were male & 33 were female. Among the children of Jessore 32 were male & 28 were female. Analyzing anthropometric data we found that the mean height, weight and MUAC of males were 90.47 cm, 13.31 kg and 14.88 cm respectively while 88.51 cm, 12.58 kg and 14.70 cm respectively in case of female. Among the children 57% were under weight, 60% were stunted and 24.5% were found wasted. According to MUAC 35% children were normal and 12.5% children were severely malnourished in those three districts of Bangladesh.
Keywords
Preschool Children, Underweight, Infant, Malnutrition
To cite this article
Md. Tanvir Sarwar, Mst Amina Sultana, Shammy Akter, Md. Sidur Rahman, Shakh M. A. Rouf, Md. Salim Raza, M. Sabir Hossain, A Study on the Nutritional Status of Preschool Children in Three Districts of Bangladesh, Science Journal of Public Health. Vol. 3, No. 5, 2015, pp. 633-637. doi: 10.11648/j.sjph.20150305.16
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