Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Mentha viridis
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume 2, Issue 5, September 2017, Pages: 60-66
Received: Aug. 22, 2017; Accepted: Sep. 12, 2017; Published: Oct. 17, 2017
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Authors
Osman Yahia Balla, Medicinal and Aromatic Plants and Traditional Medicine Research Institute (MAPTMRI), National Center for Research, Khartoum, Suda
Mahmoud Mohamed Ali, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Pure and Applied Science, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
Mohamed Ismail Garbi, Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
Ahmed Saeed Kabbashi, Medicinal and Aromatic Plants and Traditional Medicine Research Institute (MAPTMRI), National Center for Research, Khartoum, Suda; Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, International University of Africa, Khartoum, Sudan
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Abstract
The study was aimed to investigate essential oil chemical composition and antimicrobial activities of essential oils extracted from leaves of Mentha viridis. The oil was extracted by hydrodistillation method and analyzed by Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), to determine the chemical composition of the volatile fraction and identify their chemo-types. The essential oil of M. viridis leaves were tested against four standard bacterial species: two Gram-positive bacteria viz, Bacillus subtilis (NCTC 8236) and Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923), two Gram-negative bacterial strains Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 27853), and fungal strains viz, Candida albicans (ATCC 7596) using the agar plate diffusion method. GC-MS analysis revealed that M. viridis was constituted by D-Carvone (64.63%) as a major component followed by D-Limonene (12.27%), (-)-8-p-Menthen- 2-yl, acetate, trans (2.59%), Cyclohexanol, 2-methyl - 5- (1-methylethenyl) (2.36%), Eucalyptol (2.28%), 3-Hexadecyne (1.82%), Caryophyllene (1.72%), Beta–myrcene (1.43%), Trans-Carveyl acetate (1.37%), (-). Beta-Bourbonene (1.08%), and other traces compounds. Antimicrobial activity of essential oil of M. viridis dissolved in methanol (1:10), showed high activity against the Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli & P. aeruginosa) (17 & 16 mm). It also showed against Gram positive bacteria (B. subtilis & S. aureus) (16 & 15 mm) and against (C. albicans) (16 mm). This study conducted for essential oil of M. viridis leaves proved to have potent activities against antimicrobial activity in vitro.
Keywords
In-vitro, Antimicrobial Activity, Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS), Essential Oils, Mentha viridis (Leaves)
To cite this article
Osman Yahia Balla, Mahmoud Mohamed Ali, Mohamed Ismail Garbi, Ahmed Saeed Kabbashi, Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial Activity of Essential Oil of Mentha viridis, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Vol. 2, No. 5, 2017, pp. 60-66. doi: 10.11648/j.bmb.20170205.12
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Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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