Inhibition of mRNA Maturation by Compounds Which Have a Flavonoid Skeleton
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Volume 2, Issue 4, July 2017, Pages: 46-53
Received: Jun. 19, 2017; Accepted: Jun. 29, 2017; Published: Jul. 31, 2017
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Authors
Masashi Kurata, Division of Integrated Life Sciences, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya, Japan
Mari Morimoto, Division of Integrated Life Sciences, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Yuko Kawamura, Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyoto Women’s University, Kyoto, Japan
Intisar Fouad Ali Mursi, Division of Integrated Life Sciences, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Keiko Momma, Department of Living and Welfare, Kyoto Women’s University, Kyoto, Japan
Masakazu Takahashi, Department of Bioscience, Fukui Prefectural University, Fukui, Japan
Yusaku Miyamae, Division of Integrated Life Sciences, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Taiho Kambe, Division of Integrated Life Sciences, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Masaya Nagao, Division of Integrated Life Sciences, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Hiroshi Narita, Department of Food and Nutrition, Kyoto Women’s University, Kyoto, Japan
Yasuyuki Shibuya, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya, Japan
Seiji Masuda, Division of Integrated Life Sciences, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
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Abstract
Post-transcriptional modifications of nascent mRNA include 5’ capping, splicing and 3’ end polyadenylation, resulting in the emergence of mature mRNA. Recent findings indicate that mRNA splicing inhibitors can be potential anti-cancer candidates. Soy-isoflavone fractions displayed an inhibitory effect of mRNA processing among a number of dietary components. Two major components of the isoflavone fraction, daidzin and genistin did not have an inhibitory activity against mRNA maturation. The aglycone form of them also failed to inhibit mRNA maturation. Instead, compounds with flavone skeleton inhibited the mRNA maturation in the nucleus. Considering that the structural difference between flavone and isoflavone compounds is that B-ring is attached either on the 2’ or 3’ position of C-ring, respectively, anti-mRNA maturation activity may require a defined structural basis. These data indicate that compounds with flavone skeleton specifically alter the mRNA processing step.
Keywords
Flavone, Luciferase Reporter, RNA-FISH
To cite this article
Masashi Kurata, Mari Morimoto, Yuko Kawamura, Intisar Fouad Ali Mursi, Keiko Momma, Masakazu Takahashi, Yusaku Miyamae, Taiho Kambe, Masaya Nagao, Hiroshi Narita, Yasuyuki Shibuya, Seiji Masuda, Inhibition of mRNA Maturation by Compounds Which Have a Flavonoid Skeleton, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2017, pp. 46-53. doi: 10.11648/j.bmb.20170204.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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