Please enter verification code
Confirm
Removal of Copper and Fluoride from Wastewater by the Coupling of Electrocoagulation, Fluidized Bed and Micro-Electrolysis (EC/FB/ME) Process
American Journal of Chemical Engineering
Volume 2, Issue 6, November 2014, Pages: 86-91
Received: Nov. 7, 2014; Accepted: Nov. 12, 2014; Published: Nov. 20, 2014
Views 3575      Downloads 321
Authors
Vo Anh Khue, Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Yunnan 650500, China; Faculty of Chemical Engineering, Tuy Hoa Industrial College, Phu Yen 620900, Vietnam
Li Tian Guo, Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Yunnan 650500, China
Xu Xiao Jun, Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Yunnan 650500, China
Yue Xiu Lin, Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Yunnan 650500, China
Peng Rui Hao, Faculty of Environmental Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Yunnan 650500, China
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Copper and fluoride ions were removed from wastewater by the coupling of electrocoagulation, fluidized bed and micro-electrolysis (EC/FB/ME) process. The results indicate that the use of aluminum electrode for simultaneous removal of copper and fluoride ions is better than iron electrode. By the orthogonal experiments study of the main factors influencing the efficiency of the treatment process, the best control parameters of this process were achieved in four aluminum electrodes, an initial pH of 5.0, a hydraulic retention time of 30 minutes, an applied voltage of 5V, a mass of iron-carbon (Fe/C) of 45g and the particle diameter of Fe/C of 20-27 mesh. With these conditions and the initial concentration of ions of 50mg/L, the residual concentration of copper and fluoride are 0.205 mg/L and 2.936 mg/L, respectively. The EC/FB/ME process is suitable for treatment of wastewater that fluoride concentration is less than 50 mg/L and copper concentration is less than 200 mg/L. This process was successfully applied to the treatment of a smelting wastewater sample.
Keywords
Electrocoagulation, Micro-Electrolysis, Iron Electrode, Aluminum Electrode, Copper and Fluoride Ions, Fluidized Bed
To cite this article
Vo Anh Khue, Li Tian Guo, Xu Xiao Jun, Yue Xiu Lin, Peng Rui Hao, Removal of Copper and Fluoride from Wastewater by the Coupling of Electrocoagulation, Fluidized Bed and Micro-Electrolysis (EC/FB/ME) Process, American Journal of Chemical Engineering. Vol. 2, No. 6, 2014, pp. 86-91. doi: 10.11648/j.ajche.20140206.13
References
[1]
T. A. Kurniawan, G. Y. S. Chan, W. H. Lu, S. Babel, “Physico-chemical treatment techniques for wastewater laden with heavy metals,” Chemical Engineering Journal, 2006, 118, pp. 83-98.
[2]
Zh. Gu, Zh. H. Liao, M. Schulz, J. R. Davis, J. C. Bagents, J. Farrell, “Estimating Dosing Rates and Energy Consumption for Electrocoagulation Using Iron and Aluminum Electrodes,” Ind. Eng. Chem. Res., 2009, 48, pp. 3112-3117.
[3]
U. Kurt, M. T. Gonullu, F. Ilhan, K. Varinca, “Treatment of domestic wastewater by Electrocoagulation in a cell with Fe–Fe electrodes,” Environmental Engineering Science, 2008, 25(2), pp. 153-162.
[4]
Y. F. Zhou, M. Liu, Q. Wu, “Water quality improvement of a lagoon containing mixed chemical industrial wastewater by micro-electrolysis-contact oxidization,” Journal of Zhejiang University-Science A (Applied Physics & Engineering), 2011, 12 (5), pp. 390-398.
[5]
M. Kobya, O. T. Can, M. Bayramoglu, “Treatment of textile wastewaters by Electrocoagulation using iron and aluminium electrodes,” Journal of Hazardous Materials, 2003, B 100, pp. 163-178.
[6]
N. Adhoum, L. Monser, “Decolourization and removal of phenolic compounds from olive mill wastewater by Electrocoagulation,” Chemical engineering and Processing, 2004, 43, pp. 1281-1287.
[7]
J. Nouri, A. H. Mahvi, E. Bazrafshan, “Application of Electrocoagulation process in removal of zinc and copper from aqueous solutions by aluminium electrodes,” International Journal of Environmental Research, 2010, 4, pp. 201-208.
[8]
J. J. Yang, X. J. Xu ,G. Wang, W. Pan, H. Z. Yu, G. T. Zhen, T. Rui, “Treatment of zinc and lead smelting wastewater containing heavy metals by combined process of microelectrolysis with flocculation,” The Chinese jounal of nonferrous metals, 2012, 22(7), pp. 2125-2132.
[9]
X. L. Dai, “Study on the treatment of chromium-containing wastewater of galvanization by utilizing the technology of micro-electrolysis and its application,” Industrial water treatment, 2005, 25(1), pp. 69-71.
[10]
AWWA and WEF, “Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Wastewater,” American Water Works Association and Water Environment Federation, Washington, D.C, 1998.
[11]
D. Konstantinos, A. Christoforidis, E. Valsamidou, “Removal of nickel, copper, zinc and chromium from synthetic and industrial wastewater by Electrocoagulation,” International Journal of Environmental Sciences, 2011, 1(5), pp. 697-710.
[12]
N. Mameri, A. R. Yeddou, H. Lounici, D. Belhocine, H. Grib, B. Bariou, “Defuorination of septentrional Sahara water of North Africa by Electrocoagulation process using bipolar aluminium electrodes,” Water Research, 1998, 32(5), pp. 1604–1612.
[13]
K. Chomsamutr, S. Jongprasithporn, “Optimization parameters of tool life model using the Taguchi approach and response surface methodology,” IJCSI International Journal of Computer Science, 2012, 9, 1(3), pp. 120-125.
[14]
Z. Zaroual, M. Azzi, N. Sai, E. Chainet, “Contribution to the study of Electrocoagulation mechanism in basic textile effluent,” Journal of Hazardous Materials, 2006, 131(1-3), pp. 73-78.
[15]
P. T. Bolger and D. C. Szlag, “Electrochemical treatment and reuse of nickel plating rinse waters,” Environmental Progress, 2004, 21, pp. 203-208.
[16]
T. Picard, G. C. Feuillade, M. Mazet, C. Vandensteendam, “Cathodic dissolution in the electrocoagulation process using aluminum electrodes,” J. En iron. Monit. , 2000, 2, pp. 77–80.
[17]
M. M. Emamjomeh, M. Sivakumar, “Denitrification using a monopolar Electrocoagulation/flotation (ECF) process,” Journal of Environmental Management, 2009, 91, pp. 516-522.
[18]
F. Shen, X. M. Chen, P. Gao, G. H. Chen, “Electrochemical removal of fluoride ions from industrial wastewater,” Chemical Engineering Science, 2003, 58, pp. 987 – 993.
[19]
C. Hicyilmaz, S. Bilgen, K. E. Ozbas, “The effect of dissolved species on hydrophobic aggregation of fluorite,” Colloids and Surfaces, 1997, 121, pp. 15–21.
[20]
J. Zhu, H. Zh. Zhao, J. R. Ni, “Fluoride distribution in Electrocoagulation defluoridation process,” Elsevier Separation and Purification Technology, 2007, 56, pp. 184-191.
[21]
C.Y. Hu, S.L. Lo, W.H. Kuan, “Effects of co-existing anions on fluoride removal in electrocoagulation (EC) process using aluminum electrodes,” Water Res. , 2003, 37, pp. 4513–4523.
[22]
M. Lui, R.Y. Sun, J.H. Zhang, Y. Bina, L. Wei, “Elimination of excess fluoride in potablewaterwith coarcervation by electrolysis using aluminum anode,” Fluoride, 1983, 20, pp. 54–63.
[23]
C. Y. Hu, S. L. Lo, W. H. Kuan, “Effects of themolar ratio of hydroxide and fluoride to Al(III) on fluoride removal by coagulation and electrocoagulation,” J. Colloid Interface Sci., 2005, 283, pp. 472–476.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186