Potential In-Vivo Evaluation of Analgesic Investigation of Mangifera indica and Antimicrobial Activity of Areca catechu
American Journal of BioScience
Volume 3, Issue 2-1, April 2015, Pages: 19-22
Received: Feb. 9, 2015; Accepted: Feb. 10, 2015; Published: Feb. 27, 2015
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Authors
Mst. Marium Begum, Department of Pharmacy, Primeasia University, Dhaka-1213, Bangladesh
Taslima Begum, Department of Pharmacy, Primeasia University, Dhaka-1213, Bangladesh
Mohammad Ashikur Rahman, Department of Pharmacy, Primeasia University, Dhaka-1213, Bangladesh
Tahmina Haque, Department of Pharmacy, Primeasia University, Dhaka-1213, Bangladesh
Md. Abir Khan, Department of Pharmacy, Primeasia University, Dhaka-1213, Bangladesh
Md. Belal Hossain, Department of Pharmacy, Dhaka International University, Dhaka-1213, Bangladesh
Hasan Tarek, Department of Pharmacy, Dhaka International University, Dhaka-1213, Bangladesh
Md. Noor-A-Alam, Department of Pharmacy, Dhaka International University, Dhaka-1213, Bangladesh
Md. Reyad-ul- Ferdous, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, North South University, Dhaka-1229, Bangladesh; ; Department of Pharmacy, Progati Medical Institute, Dhaka-1216, Bangladesh
Md. Safkath Ibne Jami, Department of Pharmacy, University of Asia Pacific, Dhaka-1205, Bangladesh
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Abstract
This project report describes the biological activity of the dried leaves of Mangifera indica belonging to the family Anacardiaceae and the dried fruits of Areca catechu belonging to the family Arecaceae. The dried powders of leaves and fruits were extracted with organic solvents –Carbon tetrachloride, Methanol & Pet ether sequentially by maceration process. After this, The crude extracts of Carbon tetrachloride, Methanol & Pet ether were investigated for analgesic and antimicrobial property. For Mangifera indica, the crude extracts of Carbon tetrachloride, Methanol & Pet ether were studied for analgesic property at an oral dose of 200 mg /kg of body weight using acetic acid induced writhing effect method. The result showed that the Methanol and Pet ether extracts had mild analgesic property (having a writhing inhibition of 51.7% and 50% respectively), while carbon tetrachloride extract did not show significant analgesic property (having a writhing inhibition of 30 %). For Areca catechu, the crude extracts of Carbon tetrachloride, Methanol & Pet ether were screened for antimicrobial activity against gram positive and gram negative bacteria and fungi using disk diffusion method. The results obtained were compared with that of standard drug kanamycin. The Carbon tetrachloride extract showed mild sensitivity to several gram positive, gram negative bacteria & Fungi (zone of inhibition 9-10 mm). The Methanol extract also showed mild sensitivity to several gram positive, gram negative bacteria & Fungi (zone of inhibition 7-10 mm).and slightly to highly sensitive to fungi (zone of inhibition 8-40 mm). The pet ether extract Crystal (Found after adding Carbon tetrachloride) showed mild sensitivity to only a gram negative bacteria (Shigella boydii) having zone of inhibition 7 mm.
Keywords
Mangifera indica, Anacardiaceae, Areca catechu Arecaceae, Antimicrobial Activity, Disc Diffusion Method, Analgesic Activity, Writhing Effect
To cite this article
Mst. Marium Begum, Taslima Begum, Mohammad Ashikur Rahman, Tahmina Haque, Md. Abir Khan, Md. Belal Hossain, Hasan Tarek, Md. Noor-A-Alam, Md. Reyad-ul- Ferdous, Md. Safkath Ibne Jami, Potential In-Vivo Evaluation of Analgesic Investigation of Mangifera indica and Antimicrobial Activity of Areca catechu, American Journal of BioScience. Special Issue:Pharmacological and Phytochemicals Investigation. Vol. 3, No. 2-1, 2015, pp. 19-22. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbio.s.2015030201.14
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