Comparison of Three Diagnostic Methods for the Detection of Cytomegalovirus and Toxoplasma gondii IgG Antibodies at Prenatal Screening
American Journal of BioScience
Volume 8, Issue 1, January 2020, Pages: 15-19
Received: Mar. 6, 2020; Accepted: Mar. 31, 2020; Published: Apr. 13, 2020
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Authors
Genco Francesca, Microbiology and Virology Unit, Fondazione Istituto di Ricerca e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy
Meroni Valeria, Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Therapy, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy
De Silvestri Annalisa, Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, Fondazione Istituto di Ricerca e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy
Bouthry Elise, Lab. CERBA Saint-Ouen-l'Aumône, Paris, France
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Abstract
Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections are typically asymptomatic infections, but they can have serious consequences mainly in newborns and immunocompromised patients. In many parts of the world, these infections are routinely screened during pregnancy (toxoplasmosis) and, in others, high-risk individuals are tested using fully automated screening assays. In this study, we investigated the performance of the three fully automated immunoassays, LIAISON® XL DiaSorin, Abbott Architect and Roche Cobas®, for the determination of specific IgG antibodies to Cytomegalovirus and Toxoplasma gondii in human serum or plasma samples in terms of prevalence of CMV and Toxo IgG detected, and both sensitivity and specificity. Performance of the LIAISON® assays was investigated compared to two other assays, ARCHITECT (CMV IgG and Toxo IgG assays) and Cobas® (CMV IgG and Toxo IgG assays). Discrepant anti CMV IgG and anti Toxoplasma IgG samples were tested for IgM to CMV and Toxoplasma to exclude early acute infection where IgG could be detected differently by the methods. Overall, for both CMV IgG and Toxo IgG, the LIAISON® assay was better than both the Cobas® and ARCHITECT assays in terms of CMV and Toxo IgG detected, and both diagnostic sensitivity and specificity performance although the difference is statistically significant only compared to Cobas®.
Keywords
Toxoplasma gondii, Cytomegalovirus, Prenatal Screening, Anti-cytomegalovirus IgG Antibodies, Anti-toxoplasma IgG Antibodies
To cite this article
Genco Francesca, Meroni Valeria, De Silvestri Annalisa, Bouthry Elise, Comparison of Three Diagnostic Methods for the Detection of Cytomegalovirus and Toxoplasma gondii IgG Antibodies at Prenatal Screening, American Journal of BioScience. Vol. 8, No. 1, 2020, pp. 15-19. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbio.20200801.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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