Onset of Metabolic Syndrome: A Short Review on the Current Risk Towards Bangladeshi Women
American Journal of BioScience
Volume 3, Issue 3, May 2015, Pages: 114-116
Received: May 9, 2015; Accepted: May 15, 2015; Published: May 28, 2015
Views 2707      Downloads 56
Authors
Taslima Rafique, Department of Physiology with Biochemistry, Sapporo Dental College & Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Zebunnesa Zeba, Department of Natural Science, Stamford University Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Rashed Noor, Department of Microbiology, Stamford University Bangladesh, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Article Tools
Follow on us
Abstract
Metabolic syndrome (MS) describes the co-occurrence of central adiposity, dysglycemia, hypertension, lipid abnormalities and a number of other metabolic changes that increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases with concomitant adverse effects on other organs too. Now a day, it is one of the fastest growing public health burdens in the Asia-Pacific region. But people in this region are no more overweight than Europeans and Americans. Unfortunately, in South Asia, MS screening has only been performed in a few countries other than Bangladesh. Although the food habit, physical activity and life style of Bangladeshi population have been changed to a relatively healthier approach, several studies still revealed that rural women of Bangladesh are at risk of developing MS. Present review thus emphasized to create awareness among rural as well as urban women about MS, in clustering form and also about its individual component.
Keywords
Metabolic Syndrome (MS), Cardio Vascular Diseases (CVD), Bangladeshi Women
To cite this article
Taslima Rafique, Zebunnesa Zeba, Rashed Noor, Onset of Metabolic Syndrome: A Short Review on the Current Risk Towards Bangladeshi Women, American Journal of BioScience. Vol. 3, No. 3, 2015, pp. 114-116. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbio.20150303.16
References
[1]
K. G. Alberti and P. Z. Zimmet, “Definition, diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus and its complications. Part 1: diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus provisional report of a WHO consultation”, Diabetic Med. Vol. 15, pp. 539-553, 1998.
[2]
B. Balkau and M. A. Charles, “Comment on the provisional report from the WHO consultation,’’ Diabet. Med., vol. 16, pp. 442-443, 1999.
[3]
B. Hildrum, A. Mykletun, T. Hole, K. Midthjell and A. A. Dahl, “Age-specific prevalence of the MS defined by the IDF and national cholesterol education program: the Norwegian HUNT 2 study,” BMC Publ. Health, vol. 7, pp. 220, 2007.
[4]
C. Magat, N. K. Goel, D. K. Walia, N. Agawal, M. K. Sharma, J. Kaur, R. Singh and G. Singh, “Metabolic syndrome: a challenging health issue in highly urbanized union territory of north India,” Diabetol Metab. Syndr, vol. 2, pp. 19, 2010.
[5]
D. Eapen, G. L. Kalra, N. Merchant, A. Arora, B. V. Khan, “Metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease in south Asians,” Vasc. Health Risk Manag, vol. 5, pp. 731-743, 2009.
[6]
M. Gupta, N. Singh, S. Verma, “South Asians and cardiovascular risk: what clinicians should know,” Circulation, vol. 113, pp. e924-e929, 2006.
[7]
M. Deepa, S. Farooq, M. Datta M, et al., “Prevalence of metabolic syndrome using WHO, ATPIII and IDF definitions in Asian Indians: The Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study,” Diabetes Metab. Res. Rev. vol. 23, pp. 127-34, 2006.
[8]
A. Misra, R. Misra, M. Wijesuriya and D. Banerjee, “The metabolic syndrome in South Asians continuing escalation and possible solutions,” Indian J. Med. Res., vol. 125, pp. 345-354, 2007.
[9]
R. Noor and M. S. Munna, “Emerging diseases in Bangladesh: current microbiological research,” Tzu Chi Med. J., 2015. DOI: 10.1016/j.tcmj.2015.01.003
[10]
P. Loria, A. Lonardo, L. Carulli, et al., “Review article: the metabolic syndrome and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease,” Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther., vol. 22, pp. 31-6, 2005.
[11]
Z. Mostafa, A. Jasimuddin, C. Sohel, et al., “Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in rural Bangladeshi women,” Diabetes Care, vol. 29, pp. 1456-1457, 2006.
[12]
Jesmin S, Islam MR, Islam AM, et al. Comprehensive assessment of metabolic syndrome among rural Bangladeshi women. BMC Public Health. 2012; 19;12:49.
[13]
M. Deepa, S. Farooq, M. Datta, R. Deepa and V. Mohan, “Prevalence of metabolic syndrome using WHO, ATPIII and IDF definitions in Asian Indians: the Chennai urban rural epidemiology study (CURES-34),” Diabetes Metab. Res. Rev., vol. 23, pp. 127-134, 2007.
[14]
R. Gupta, P. C. Deedwania, A. Gupta, S. Rastogi, R. B. Panwar and K. Kothari, “Prevalence of metabolic syndrome in an Indian urban population,” Int. J. Cardiol., vol. 97, pp. 257-261, 2007.
[15]
A. Misra, R. M. Pandey, J. R. Devi, R. Sharma R, N. K. Vikram and N. Khanna, “High prevalence of diabetes, obesity and dyslipidaemia in urban slum population in northern India,” Int. J. Obes. Relat. Metab. Disord. Vol. 25, pp. 1722-1729, 2001.
[16]
S. Lewington, G. Whitlock, R. Clarke, et al., “Blood cholesterol and vascular mortality by age, sex, and blood pressure: a meta-analysis of individual data from 61 prospective studies with 55,000 vascular deaths,” Lancet, vol. 370, pp.1829-1839, 2007.
[17]
P. Linsel-Nitschke and A. R. Tall, “HDL as a target in the treatment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease,” Nat. Rev. Drug Discov. Vol. 4, pp. 193-205, 2005.
[18]
M. Das, S. Pal and A. Ghosh, “Rural urban differences of cardiovascular disease risk factors in adult Asian Indians,” Am. J. Hum. Biol., vol. 20, pp. 440-445, 2008.
[19]
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, “Executive summary of the third report of the national cholesterol education program (NCEP) expert panel on detection, evaluation, and treatment of high blood cholesterol in adults (Adult Treatment Panel III),” JAMA, vol. 285, pp. 2486–2497, 2005.
[20]
H. Shimokata, D. C. Muller and R. Anders, “Studies in the distribution of body fat. III. Effects of cigarette smoking,” JAMA, vol. 261, pp. 1169–1173, 1989.
[21]
V. Mohan and M. Deepa, “The metabolic syndrome in developing countries,” Diabetes Voice, vol. 51, pp. 15-17, 2006.
[22]
S. Jesmin, A. M. Islam, S. Akter, et al., ‘Metabolic syndrome among pre- and post-menopausal rural women in Bangladesh: result from a population-based study,” BMC Res. Notes, vol. 6, pp. 157, 2013.
[23]
S. Jesmin, M. R. Islam, A. M. Islam, et al., “Comprehensive assessment of metabolic syndrome among rural Bangladeshi women,” BMC Public Health, vol. 19, pp. 12:49, 2012.
[24]
S. Jesmin, M. R. Islam, A. M. Islam, et al., “Prevalence of metabolic syndrome among rural Bangladeshi women,” Diabetes Res. Clin. Pract., vol. 95, pp. e7-9, 2012.
[25]
S. Akter, S. Jesmin, M. Islam, S. N. Sultana, O. Okazaki, M. Hiroe, M. Moroi and T. Mizutani, “Association of age at menarche with metabolic syndrome and its components in rural Bangladeshi women,” Nutr. Metab. (Lond.), vol. 9, pp. 99, 2012.
ADDRESS
Science Publishing Group
1 Rockefeller Plaza,
10th and 11th Floors,
New York, NY 10020
U.S.A.
Tel: (001)347-983-5186