Serum Cystatin C an Early Indicator of Renal Function Decline in Type 2 Diabetes
American Journal of BioScience
Volume 2, Issue 3, May 2014, Pages: 89-94
Received: Mar. 29, 2014; Accepted: Apr. 20, 2014; Published: Apr. 30, 2014
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Authors
Hany S. Elbarbary, Internal Medicine Dept. Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Shebein Elkom, Menoufia, Egypt
Nabil A. El-Kafrawy, Internal Medicine Dept. Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Shebein Elkom, Menoufia, Egypt
Ahmed A. Shoaib, Internal Medicine Dept. Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Shebein Elkom, Menoufia, Egypt
Samar M. Kamal El-deen, Clinical Pathology Dept. Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Egypt
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Abstract
Objectives: evaluation of cystatin C level in the serum as a predictor of early renal impairment in type 2 diabetic patients. Background: the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is often estimated from plasma creatinine. Several studies have shown that cystatin C (Cys C) can be used as a better marker for the early detection of renal function decline. Methods: patients were classified according to the urine albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR).Plasma samples were obtained from 20 healthy persons and from 40 patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 for determination of the level of creatinine and cystatin C. Results: There were no significant differences in age and sex between the three groups. However, There was a significant positive correlation between cystatin C and age, A/C ratio, HbA1c, FBS, 2HPP, DM duration and serum creatinine, and there was a significant negative correlation between cystatin C and glomerular filtration rate. eGFR was significantly lower in the macroalbuminuric group than in the micro-albuminuric and normo-albuminuric groups, and cystatin C showed the highest sensitivity and specificity in detecting micro and macro-albuminuria and accordingly early renal function decline in diabetic patients. Conclusion: from this study we concluded that serum cystatin C is a useful, practical, and non-invasive tool for early detection of renal impairment in the course of diabetes.
Keywords
Creatinine, Cystatin C, Glomerular Filtration Rate, Diabetes Mellitus
To cite this article
Hany S. Elbarbary, Nabil A. El-Kafrawy, Ahmed A. Shoaib, Samar M. Kamal El-deen, Serum Cystatin C an Early Indicator of Renal Function Decline in Type 2 Diabetes, American Journal of BioScience. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2014, pp. 89-94. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbio.20140203.12
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