Survey of Lysogenic Phages in the 72 Strains of Escherichia coli Collection of Reference (ECOR) and Identification of a Phage Derived from the ECOR52 Strain
American Journal of BioScience
Volume 2, Issue 2, March 2014, Pages: 32-37
Received: Jan. 29, 2014; Published: Feb. 28, 2014
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Authors
Yuka Shibata, Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Nara Women’s University, Nara, Japan
Chisato Ugumori, Faculty of Human Life and Environment, Nara Women’s University, Nara, Japan
Anna Takahashi, Faculty of Human Life and Environment, Nara Women’s University, Nara, Japan
Ayuka Sekoguchi, Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Nara Women’s University, Nara, Japan
Sumio Maeda, Graduate School of Humanities and Sciences, Nara Women’s University, Nara, Japan;Faculty of Human Life and Environment, Nara Women’s University, Nara, Japan
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Abstract
Escherichia coli collection of reference (ECOR) is a standard collection of 72 wild-type E. coli strains that represent natural E. coli populations found in various environments. Although these strains are widely used in experiments investigating the physiology and behavior of wild-type E. coli, their genetic features including accessory DNA have not been sufficiently studied. In this study, we surveyed for the presence of lysogenic phages in each ECOR strain under both inducing and non-inducing conditions. We found that 34 strains could produce plaque-forming phages; among them, 14 strains were newly discovered to harbor lysogenic phages capable of entering the lytic cycle. We isolated a new phage (designated as “MSU52-L1”) from the ECOR52 strain and identified it as a P22/lambda-like phage with homology to known phages, such as CUS-3, HK620, and HK140.
Keywords
Bacteriophage, Escherichia coli Collection of Reference, Lambdoid Phage, P22
To cite this article
Yuka Shibata, Chisato Ugumori, Anna Takahashi, Ayuka Sekoguchi, Sumio Maeda, Survey of Lysogenic Phages in the 72 Strains of Escherichia coli Collection of Reference (ECOR) and Identification of a Phage Derived from the ECOR52 Strain, American Journal of BioScience. Vol. 2, No. 2, 2014, pp. 32-37. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbio.20140202.12
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