Recycling Polyurethane Materials to Improve Properties of Wood Composite Panels
American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry
Volume 7, Issue 4, July 2019, Pages: 146-151
Received: Jul. 12, 2019; Accepted: Aug. 4, 2019; Published: Aug. 15, 2019
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Authors
Xiaosheng Liu, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Yanfang Pang, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Tongtong Cui, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Yan Li, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Enhua Xi, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Xin Liu, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Qi Li, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China
Hui Wan, College of Material and Engineering, Southwest Forestry University, Kunming, China
An Mao, Key Laboratory of State Forestry Administration for Silviculture of the Lower Yellow River, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian, China; Beijing Key Laboratory of Wood Science and Engineering, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, China
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Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using polyurethane (PU) foam wastes obtained from automobile shredder residue (ASR) in wood composite panel (fiberboard) production. PU foam wastes from ASR were picked by hand, cleaned by water and acetone, grounded into powders of two sizes (60 mesh and 120 mesh), and dried to remove moisture. The PU powders were characterized by stereomicroscope and then partially replaced pMDI resin at percentages of 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, and 50% (based on the weight of pMDI resin). The PU powders were mixed with wood fibers to make fiberboards. The results showed that the addition of PU powders increased both the physical and mechanical properties of fiberboards. At replacing percentages from 5% to 30%, the properties of fiberboards increased. However, further increase of replacing percentages (from 30% to 50%) resulted in lower properties of fiberboard. When observed at a magnification of 125 times by a stereomicroscope, PU powders of 60 mesh had more foam features while PU powders of 120 mesh had more particle features. The fiberboards bonded by pMDI resin and PU powders of 120 mesh had better water resistance and mechanical properties than those bonded by pMDI and PU powders of 60 mesh. The use of PU powders in fiberboard production provided a new possible way of recycling PU foam wastes. The fiberboard has advantages of formaldehyde-free, better water resistance, higher mechanical properties, and lower material cost.
Keywords
Polyurethane Foam Waste, Recycle, Dipheny Lmethane Diisocyanate, Fiberboard
To cite this article
Xiaosheng Liu, Yanfang Pang, Tongtong Cui, Yan Li, Enhua Xi, Xin Liu, Qi Li, Hui Wan, An Mao, Recycling Polyurethane Materials to Improve Properties of Wood Composite Panels, American Journal of Agriculture and Forestry. Vol. 7, No. 4, 2019, pp. 146-151. doi: 10.11648/j.ajaf.20190704.14
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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